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2018 Midland

Most often, reproductive diseases are identified by ranchers during pregnancy checks when the veterinarian comes to the ranch and finds more open cows than normal. For producers who don’t pregnancy check, reproductive diseases may be identified when not as many calves show up as expected. Finally, abortions lead ranchers to start thinking about reproductive diseases. 

“When we have an abortion, unfortunately, we only diagnosis the actual cause of the abortion between 30 and 44 percent of time,” says Kansas State University Veterinarian  Gregg Hanzlicek. “Diagnostics are very, very difficult in abortion work-ups.” 

However, Hanzlicek says that contagious bacteria and viruses are often implicated as the reason for abortion, and producers should be cognizant of the potential negative impact of these diseases on their herds. 

IBR

One cause of viral abortion is IBR, or infectious bovine rhinotracheitis 

“Since 2014, we have seen a huge increase in the number of IBR abortions,” Hanzlicek comments. “This is a respiratory and reproductive organism that is transmitted through aerosols.”

He notes respiratory droplets are enough to transmit IBR, and urine or vaginal fluids can also pass the disease to other animals.

“IBR is a herpes virus,” he adds. “There are a lot of positive animals out there that do not show signs.”

Hanzlicek compared IBR to shingles in humans, where humans occasionally show clinical signs of shingles, but often, the virus is latent within the system. 

“We’ve seen a huge increase in IBR abortions,” he comments. “One of the beliefs was that the use of modified live vaccines in pregnant cows was to blame. We’ve looked at several aborted calves and found the same strain of IBR that was in the vaccine.”

Hanzlicek strongly emphasizes this does not mean producers should not use modified live vaccines. 

Rather, he says, “Follow label instructions, and make sure to consult with a veterinarian on vaccination protocols.”

BVD

Another disease of concern is bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVD). 

“This is like IBR,” says Hanzlicek. “It’s both a respiratory and a reproductive organism.” 

Also similar to IBR, transmission of BVD occurs through aerosols and fluids, including saliva, vaginal secretions, uterine secretions and semen, all of which can carry the virus.

“We talk a lot of persistently infected (PI) and transiently infected (TI) animals,” he continues. “The thing we have to prevent in our cow/calf herd are persistently infected calves. Those are the calves that are born with BVD. They have a huge amount of virus in all their systems.”

Hanzlicek continues, “Any animal they are exposed to is also exposed to huge doses of this BVD virus.” 

TI animals are not born with the disease, but they are infected for a short period of time. TI livestock can also transmit the disease, but their viral load is much less than PI animals.

“It’s important that we try to prevent both TI and PI animals from getting into the cow/calf operation,” he explains.

Impacts

If a fetus is exposed to BVD from two months to term, there is the possibility the calf will be aborted. 

“Most often we talk about exposure at 40 to 100 days. If the fetus is exposed during that time and it survives, then there’s the opportunity the calf will be born a PI,” Hanzlicek comments. 

Additionally, BVD has an impact on fertility and early embryonic death.

“I looked for studies where there was natural exposure to BVD on this topic,” he says. “In one study, they took a group of cows that had not been exposed to BVD previously and exposed them to a PI cow and a PI calf during breeding.”

The cattle that were exposed and developed an immune response during the breeding season has a pregnancy rate of 44.4 percent. The cows that were exposed but did not mount an immune response until after the breeding season has a pregnancy rate of only 22.2 percent. 

“Fertility or embryonic death had a huge impact on these herds,” he comments. 

Another study using heifers that had never been exposed to BVD were exposed to PI and not-PI animals. 

“Those heifers that were exposed to a PI calf four days after insemination had a pregnancy rate of 44 percent,” he says. “The group that was not exposed to a PI animal had a pregnancy rate of 79 percent.” 

Additionally, tests showed that the exposed group lost an additional 11 percent of fetuses from 20 days to 77 days. The group that was not exposed did not lose any fetuses. 

“BVD does have an effect on fertility and early embryonic death,” Hanzlicek comments. “We still have PI animals in our cow/calf herds, even though we do a good job vaccinating and with bio-security.” 

Neospora caninum

Neospora caninum is a protozoa that has increased in prevalence in the Midwest and West. 

“We can have both horizontal and vertical transmission of this disease,” says Hanzlicek. “Horizontal is transmission from animal to animal, and vertical transmission comes from dam to calf.” 

He adds that Neospora has several outcomes for infected fetuses. 

“Infected fetuses are carriers for life, meaning the fetus has the opportunity to pass Neospora on to calves later in life,” he says, adding that abortion is also a potential outcome.

Canines are definitive hosts of Neospora. The organism reproduces in canines, including coyotes and dogs. Neospora exists in the feces, which can contaminate water or feed. Then, if goats, sheep, horses or cattle ingest the organism through infected feed or water, they are subsequently infected.

“One of the risk factors for positive herds are the number of dogs that are there, since dogs can carry the bug,” Hanzlicek says. “The number of birds in the area is also a risk factor.”

“I’m not sure we know much about this disease,” he adds. 

Effect on the herd

Research has shown that livestock  positive for Neospora caninum are two to three times more likely to abort their calves than dams not exposed. 

However, abortion risk decreases by the length of the infection. 

“There’s a lot of research that shows that in herds that are not newly infected, as the cow or heifer becomes older, even though she remains positive for the infection, her opportunity for aborting decreases through time,” he says.

Newly infected herds often show epidemic abortion, with a large number of animals aborting about the same time. 

“For herds that have been positive for some time, Neospora typically presents as a nagging decrease in fertility or a higher abortion rate than normal,” Hanzlicek says. “It often waxes and wanes.” 

He adds, “As we think about this disease more often, I’m hoping more people start to study it.” 

Hanzlicek also emphasizes significantly more research should be done to better understand Neospora and its impact. 

Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Columbus, Mont. – “Here at Midland Bull Test, we are passionate about our history, and it is our goal to share our stories, as it is this legacy that brings our business to life – our enduring attention to the essence of who we are and the philosophy we maintain,” says Midland Bull Test. “This philosophy was started with Leo, Sr. and Donna in the 1960s, and that’s the way we’ll stay.”

Over 700 bulls from seven breeds will sell April 5-6 at the Midland Bull Test sale facility outside Columbus, Mont.

The sale this year, dubbed “The Final Sort,” will feature the top five percent of 20,000 matings, with 200 Salers, Simmental, Red Angus, South Devon, Hereford and American Aberdeen bulls, as well as 500 Angus bulls.

‘The Final Sort’ is exactly that, as we sort through the bulls again and again. Here lies the process that embodies the very purpose of Midland,” says Midland Bull Test. “The performance of bulls during the test determines whether they will  clear hurdle after hurdle to be considered for ‘The Final Sort’ Sale.”

Each year, Midland strives to stay at the forefront of cattle data acquisition and analysis, gathering more information and setting out with the purpose of understanding what that data means to producers. 

Bull test

For 56 years, Midland Bull Test has measured the differences between bulls by observing and documenting average daily gain, genetic expression, phenotypic strengths and more, all with the goal of focusing on soundness and fertility. 

“In this era of genomics and expected progeny differences (EPDs) that we once only dreamed of, the actual amount of data can be overwhelming,” Midland Bull Test says. “One thing remains with the sale, however. Actual performance without efficiency is the true test of progress.” 

Midland strives to keep commercial cattlemen in mind as they select their criteria, using economically relevant traits to determine sale order. 

The high-roughage ration fed to bulls on test promote ultimate soundness in the feet and legs and also aids in achieving the highest levels of fertility. 

“Our bulls walk through the sale in fit using condition ready to go to work,” MBT explains. “Every effort is made to offer functional bulls that transition into the life of a successful and fit asset to any operation.”

Feed efficiency

An important part of Midland Bull Test is the use of feed efficiency EPDs to attempt to capture each animal’s genetic ability to put on more weight with less feed. 

“While there are many ways to calculate feed efficiency, including feed conversion ratio and residual average daily gain, an especially useful way
is residual feed intake (RFI),” explains Midland Bull Test. 

RFI adjusts for the animal’s weight and gain when measuring feed intake. 

“An animal that eats more also tends to be larger and gain more weight,” Midland Bull Test says. “By adjusting these factors out of their intake measurement, we are able to better understand which animals process feed more efficiently.” 

When selecting for typical growth traits, as well as utilizing a measure of intake in the form of RFI, Midland Bull Test explains producers are avoiding “double counting” the animal’s size. 

RFI is expressed in actual kilograms of feed an animal will eat per day. For example, if a bull has an RFI of 0.65, producers should expect the bull’s calves to eat 0.65 kilograms more feed per day than the average calf his size. 

“Another consideration is the accuracy of prediction in selecting animals,” Midland Bull Test comments. “Single trait selection is always a bad idea. RFI is no exception for this rule.” 

Further, Midland Bull Test emphasizes RFI selection should be used in conjunction with selection for growth, including weaning weight, yearling weight and post-wean gain EPDs. 

“This will allow breeders to pick animals that gain the most while consuming the least amount of feed,” they emphasize.

Sale day

On April 5-6, bull sales start at 11 a.m., with awards presented prior to the sale. 

The sale order is determined using the Midland Bull Test Index and Estimated Sale Value. The sale order will be posted in advance of the sale, and a sale catalog is available at midlandbulltest.com. Small changes should be expected and will be posted online. 

The sale will be broadcast live online via Frontier Live Sale at frontierlivesale.com. Buyers who are unable to attend the sale can bid online or using telephone bid lines at 406-322-9911. All buyers must register prior to sale, and new buyers must provide bank references. 

On sale day, anyone who needs information can reach Midland Bull Test at 406-322-5597, 406-322-9044 or 406-322-9911. 

Joe Goggins, Roger Jacobs and Greg Goggins will serve as auctioneers for the event. 

Kurt Kangas from the American Angus Association, Gary Fike from the Red Angus Association of America, Dean Pike of the American Salers Association, Will Townsend from the American Simmental Association, Jim Brown of the North American South Devon Association and Dean Pike of the American Aberdeen Association will be available, as well. 

“Whenever people see the Circle Running M Brand, they know that over 56 years stand behind it,” MBT comments. “Bull that we develop today must walk the walk and tell their own story. This commitment provides our customers the confidence that our ‘Final Sort’ sale is just that – the final sort of top-end bulls.”

Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Dear Friends,

With anticipation, excitement and humility, the Williams and McDonnell Families personally invite you to join us for the Midland Bull Test (MBT) sales April 5-6, 2018. We are truly excited to introduce “The Final Sort” Bull Sale at Midland. Please be assured that the offering at “The Final Sort” Bull Sale is exactly that, because we sift them again and again. Here lies the process that embodies the very purpose of Midland. 

Consignors enter their top cut of bulls to Midland. We let them write their own stories. Their performance throughout the test determines whether they will clear hurdle after hurdle to be considered for the “Final Sort Sale.” 

In this era of genomics and EPDs that we once only dreamed of, one can be overwhelmed with the amount of data available these days. One thing remains the same however, actual performance with measured efficiency is the true test of progress. Producers must be careful of selecting for extremes without knowing the inputs required to maintain these cattle. Input costs are going to be the deciding factor for the commercial cattleman in the coming years. 

Midland strives to keep the commercial cattleman’s interest as a top priority when selecting criteria to publish. We use the economically relevant traits for the commercial cattleman in the overall MBT Index to determine the sale order. Midland is acutely conscious that dam and grand dam production records help the commercial cattleman to identify bulls derived from cattle who have stood the test of time. 

It is our pleasure and honor to work with so many progressive minded consignors striving to improve their herd with each passing generation of cattle. We realize selecting bulls for your herd is one of the most important decisions made for your operation each year. We focus on making bull buying an objective process in order to enhance your success. 

We welcome past and new customers to come and view the bulls at any time. Committed to your success, we look forward to cultivating many more relationships with past and new customers. 

Thank you,

Steve Williams

Midland Bull Test

Midland Bull Test welcomed two groups of Angus bulls to Columbus, Mont. this year, splitting them into two groups and two classes. 

Class 1 bulls are those animals with an actual birthweight under 85 pounds and birthweight EPD under 1.8, while those in Class 2 had an actual birthweight over 84 pounds and birthweight EPD over 1.8. 

“These groups are just a guideline to identify those lower birthweight bulls that may be suitable for use on heifers but is no way a guarantee that they would work as calving ease bulls,” Midland Bull Test says in their catalog. “Buyers still need to check them out phenotypically and make sure they meet their criteria to work on heifers.”

The final report showed a breed average for Angus Group 1 of 3.47 for ADG and 3.27 for WDA. In Group 2, the ADG average was 3.26 and WDA of 3.11.

The Angus bulls sell on April 6 beginning at 11 a.m., where lots 1 through 750 will sell. 

Group 1 Class 1 ADG leaders

Leading the Group 1 Class 1 Angus for average daily gain was lot 324 from Fisher Angus in Okeene, Okla., with an ADG of 4.36. His ADG ratio was 130, and WDA was 3.46. The bull was sired by VAR Discovery 2240. His EPDs are BW 0.1, WW 67, YW 131, M 36, RFI 3.68, Eff 95 and MBT 112.

In second place, with a final ADG of 4.3, lot 267 from Deppe Angus in Waverly, Iowa also posted an ADG ratio of 128 and WDA of 4.05. He, too, was sired by VAR Discovery 2240. His EPDs are BW 4.3, WW 85, YW 161, M 31, RFI 0.13, Eff 105 and MBT 118. 

Lots 106 and 222 tied for third and fourth place, with a final ADG of 4.22 and ADG ratio of 126. 

Lot 106 from Marda Angus Farm, LLC also posted a WDA of 3.57 and was sired by JMB Traction 292. He posted EPDs of BW 1.8, WW 68, YW 115, M 25, RFI 1.32, Eff 106 and MBT 114. 

Lot 222 was a son of MAR Innovation 251 from Stewart Select Angus LLC of Greensburg, Ind. and has a WDA of 3.12. He also has EPDs of BW 2.0, WW 70, YW 123, M 28, RFI -3.42, Eff 125 and MBT 114. 

Rounding out the top five, Harrison Angus Ranch of Boyd, Mont. consigned lot 20, and the bull posted a final ADG of 4.19 and ADG ratio of 125. The son of ER Commando 1366 has a WDA of 3.54 and EPDs of BW 0.5, WW 65, YW 113, M 20, RFI -1.26, Eff 115 and MBT 115. 

Group 1 Class 1 WDA leaders

The Group 1 Class 1 Angus bulls saw similar stats win the weight per day of age category, with five bulls posting top scores. 

A WDA of 4.05 earned Deppe Angus’ lot 267 the top slot in the category, and he was followed by a second place lot 259, also consigned by Deppe Angus, with a WDA of 3.62. 

Lot 267 has EPDs of BW 4.3, WW 85, YW 161, M 31, RFI 0.13, Eff 105 and MBT 118, and he was sired by VAR Discovery 2240.

Next, lot 259 was sired by Connealy Capitalist 28 and has a final ADG of 3.28 and ADG ratio of 98. He has EPDs of BW 3.2, WW 65, YW 116, M 23, RFI -1.57, Eff 105 and MBT 107. 

In third place, lot 19 has a WDA of 3.61. The son of  Krein Blk Granite Robust 519, he was consigned by LK Bar Angus Ranch of St. Ignatius, Mont. He has a final ADG of 3.73, an ADG ratio of 111 and EPDs of BW 0.1, WW 67, YW 111, M 28, RFI -1.04, Eff 107 and MBT 107. 

Next, Marda Angus Farm’s lot 106 has a WDA of 3.57. He also posted a final ADG of 4.22 and ADG ratio of 126. He was sired by JMB Traction 292 and has EPDs of BW 1.8, WW 68, YW 115, M 25, RFI 1.32, Eff 106 and MBT 114.

In the fifth slot for WDA, as he did for ADG, was Harrison Angus Ranch’s lot 20. The EF Commando 1366 son has a WDA of 3.54, final ADG of 4.19 and ADG ratio of 125. His EPDs are BW 0.5, WW 65, YW 113, M 20, RFI -1.26, Eff 115 and MBT 115.

Group 1 Class 2 ADG leaders

Class 2 was led by lot 225, a Stewart Select Angus, LLC consignment from Greensburg, Ind. The bull has a final ADG of 4.56 and ADG ratio of 131. Sired by Deer Valley Patriot 322, he also has a WDA of 3.58 and EPDs of BW 2.8, WW 82, YW 146, M 30, RFI -1.81, Eff 113 and MBT 117. 

Next, lot 7 from Flying AJ Ranch in Stevensville, Mont. has a final ADG of 4.43 and ADG ratio of 128. He also has a WDA of 3.29 and was sired by 44 Ten-Gallon Z418. His EPDs are BW -0.1, WW 58, YW 110, M 33, RFI -1.61, Eff 112 and MBT 110.

In third, a Hilltop Wide Open 4215 son with a final ADG of 4.36 has an ADG ratio of 126. The bull, lot 348, was consigned by Wild West Angus of Dairy, Ore. and has a WDA of 3.5 and EPDs of BW 1.9, WW 73, YW 147, M 24, RFI -0.55, Eff 108 and MBT 114.

Next, lot 34 from Winding River Angus in Billings, Mont. took fourth place. The son of MAR Innovation 251’s final ADG of 4.3 and ADG ratio of 124 earned him the slot. He also posted a WDA of 3.48 and EPDs of BW 4.4, WW 68, YW 110, M 24, RFI -1.04, Eff 112 and MBT 113.

Fifth was lot 44, a consignment from TNT Angus in Rock Lake, N.D. The bull was a son of SydGen Rock Star 3461, and he has a final ADG of 4.32, ADG ratio of 124 and WDA of 3.49. His EPDs are BW 3.7, WW 78, YW 138, M 26, RFI -1.04, Eff 113 and MBT 112.

Group 1 Class 2 WDA leaders

Olson Cattle Company of St. Ignatius, Mont. consigned bulls that took the top two slots for Group 1 Class 2 WDA leaders, with lots 282 and 283. Both bulls were sired by HA Cowboy Up 5405.

Lot 282 has a WDA of 4.27, final ADG of 3.84 and ADG ratio of 111. He also has EPDs of BW 3.7, WW 81, YW 148, M 16, RFI -1.19, Eff 97 and MBT 110. 

Lot 283 has a WDA of 3.95, final ADG of 3.52 and ADG ratio of 101. He also posted EPDs of  BW 4.7, WW 84, YW 140, M 19, RFI -0.13, Eff 99 and MBT 108.

Next, lot 183, consigned by Steve Smith Angus of Lehi, Utah, took the third spot with a WDA of 3.74. He also has a final ADG of 3.26 and ADG ratio of 94. The bull was consigned by EXAR Denver 5163B and has EPDs of BW 2.5, WW 74, YW 123, M 20, RFI 4.94, Eff 90 and MBT 104.

Rounding out the last two leaders for Group 1 Class 2 bulls, lots 250 and 261 were consigned by Deppe Angus of Waverly, Iowa. 

Lot 250 has a WDA of 3.73. The son of AAR Ten X 7008 S A# has a final ADG of 3.91 and ADG ratio of 113, along with EPDs of BW 4.5, WW 67, YW 118, M 21, RFI -3.09, Eff 113 and MBT 113.

Finally, lot 261, a Vision Unanimous 1418 son, has a WDA of 3.71, with a final ADG of 3.73 and ADG ratio of 107. His EPDs are BW 3.0, WW 78, YW 129, M 20, RFI -1.08, Eff 104 and MBT 109. 

Group 2 Class 1 ADG leaders

In the category for Group 2 Class 1 ADG, lot 658 from 6 Mile Angus in Mandan, N.D. surpassed the others in its category with a final ADG of 4.46 and ADG ratio of 138. The Deer Valley All In son also has a WDA of 3.54 and EPDs of BW 1.3, WW 66, YW 117, M 22, RFI 1.30, Eff 114 and MBT 118. 

Next, lot 490, a SAV Ten Speed 3022 son, consigned by Sunny Okanogan Angus in Omak, Wash., has a final ADG of 4.20, ADG ratio at 133 and WDA of 3.3. He also has EPDs of BW 1.1, WW 57, YW 104, M 20, RFI 3.75, Eff 97 and MBT 111.

Macholan Angus of Linwood, Neb. consigned the third-placing lot 460 in the category, with a final ADG of 4.11 and ADG ratio of 127. Jindra Acclaim sired the bull, who also has a WDA of 3.24. He has EPDs of BW 1.3, WW 75, YW 154, M 29, RFI -1.81, Eff 112 and MBT 118.

Tied for fourth and fifth, lot 442, a consignment from Ward’s Flying W Angus Ranch in Gallatin Gateway, Mont., and lot 606, a consigned from Dix Angus Ranch of Stockton, Kans., have a final ADG of 4.04 and ADG ratio of 125. 

Lot 442 is a son of Hilltop Capitalist 5370 and has a WDA of 3.19. He has EPDs of BW -0.6, WW 50, YW 82, M 29, RFI -2.43, Eff 116 and MBT 113. 

Lot 606, a Basin Payweight 1682 son, has a WDA of 3.24. He also has EPDs of BW 0.7, WW 75, YW 130, M 22, RFI 2.80, Eff 93 and MBT 105.

Group 2 Class 1 WDA leaders

Fraser Ranch’s lot 630 took the top spot for WDA in Group 2 Class 1 with a WDA of 3.92. From Paxico, Kan., he was sired by McD SF Total Package 1337 and has a final ADG of 3.81 and ADG ratio of 118. He also has EPDs of BW 1.3, WW 78, YW 125, M 19, RFI -2.36, Eff 115 and MBT 116.

Next, lot 574, a consignment from Harrison Angus Ranch in Boyd, Mont., has a WDA of 3.55, final ADG of 3.48 and ADG ratio of 108. He was sired by SydGen FATE 2800 and has EPDs of BW 1.6, WW 54, YW 99, M 30, RDI -1.59, Eff 115 and MBT 114. 

Lots 658, 628 and 680 tied for third through fifth places, with a WDA of 3.54. 

From 6 Mile Angus in Mandan, N.D., lot 658 was sired by Deer Valley All In and has a final ADG of 4.46 and ADG ratio of 138. His EPDs are BW 1.3, WW 66, YW 117, M 22, RFI 1.30, Eff 114 and MBT 118.

Lot 628, a son of Fraser Fireman 1195, has a final ADG of 3.62 and ADG ratio of 112. His EPDs are BW 0.5, WW 83, YW 132, M 18, RFI -0.77, Eff 110 and MBT 110.

The VAR Discovery 2240 son, lot 680, came from Wolters Farm, Inc. in Cuba City, Wisc. With EPDs of BW 1.5, WW 74, YW 131, M 32, RFI -0.31, Eff 112 and MBT 110, he also has a 3.53 final ADG and ADG ratio of 109. 

Group 2 Class 2 ADG leaders

The Group 2 Class 2 bulls were led in ADG by lot 428, a Wheeler Mountain Ranch consignment from Whitehall, Mont. with a final ADG of 4.54 and ADG ratio of 140. The son of WMR Timeless 081 also has a WDA of 3.7 and EPDs of BW 4.7, WW 78, YW 141, M 28, RFI -1.59, Eff 114 and MBT 123. 

Next, lot 558 has a final ADG of 4.38 and ADG ratio of 135. A son of AAR Ten Gauge 1501, he has a WDA of 3.33 and was consigned by VGA Livestock of Manhattan, Mont. His EPDs are BW 3.7, WW 72, YW 124, M 18, RFI 1.61, Eff 101 and MBT 101.

Tying for third and fourth, lots 672 and 699 have a final ADG of 4.33 and an ADG ratio of 133. 

Lot 672, from Stalnaker Farm in Weston, W.Va., was sired by SAV Resource 1441 and has a WDA of 3.4. His EPDs are BW 2.9, WW 49, YW 107, M 16, RFI 0.90, Eff 105 and MBT 111.

Then, Welytok Angus of Richfield Springs, N.Y. consigned lot 699, who was sired by Welytok Mr All American 5C31, also has a WDA of 3.1, with EPDs of BW 3.2, WW 91, YW 145, M 28, RFI 3.97, Eff 96 and MBT 113.

Rounding out the category, Sunny Okanogan Angus from Omak, Wash. consigned lot 497, who posted a final ADG of 4.22 and ADG ratio of 130. The son of Plattemere Weigh Up K360 has a WDA of 3.26 and EPDs of BW 2.6, WW 63, YW 108, M 20, RFI -0.24, Eff 107 and MBT 112.

Group 2 Class 2 WDA leaders

Lot 428 topped Midland’s Group 2 Class 2 WDA category with a WDA of 3.71. Lot 428, who also led the class for ADG, was consigned by Wheeler Mountain Ranch of Whitehall, Mont. and sired by WMR Tieless 081. He has a final ADG of 4.54 and ADG ratio of 140, as well as EPDs of BW 4.7, WW 78, YW 141, M 28, RFI -1.59, Eff 114 and MBT 123.

Next, lot 475 from Elm Creek Ranch in Hebron, N.C. has a WDA of 3.63. He was sired by Young Dale Xcaliber 32X and has a final ADG of 3.62 and ADG ratio of 111. His EPDs are BW 3.3, WW 76, YW 127, M 18, RFI 2.29, Eff 96 and MBT 110.

Wheeler Mountain Ranch of Whitehall, Mont. also consigned the third-high WDA bull, with a WDA of 3.61. Lot 430 was consigned by SAV Resource 1441 and has a final ADG of 3.57 and ADG ratio of 110. His EPDs are BW 2.7, WW 73, YW 129, M 18, RFI -4.37, Eff 121 and MBT 116.

A tie for fourth and fifth came from lots 597 and 569, who posted a WDA of 3.59. 

Lot 597, consigned by SHB Angus in Reardan, Wash., also has a final ADG of 3.93 and ADG ratio of 121. He was sired by Barstow Cash. His EPDs are BW I+0.5, WW I+44, YW I+85, M I+22, RFI 1.76, Eff 94 and MBT 107.

Finally, lot 569 was consigned by Willer Timber Ridge Farms from Greencastle, Ind. He was sired by PA Fortitude 2500 and has a final ADG of 3.73 and ADG ratio of 115. He also has EPDs of BW 2.2, WW 61, YW 112, M 17, RFI -1.37, Eff 107 and MBT 113.

Sire groups

Leading the Angus bull sires for ADG was a set of bulls sired by MAR Innovation 251 and consigned by Stewart Select Angus, LLC of Greensburg, Ind. The bulls posted an ADG of 4.22, 4.18 and 3.79 for lots 222, 224 and 223, respectively.

Lot 222 has an ADG of 4.22 and EPDs of BW 2.0, WW 70, YW 123, M 28, RFI -3.42, Eff 125 and MBT 114. Lot 224 has an ADG of 4.18 and EPDs of BW 2.4, WW 68, YW 123, M 25, RFI -3.35, Eff 113 and MBT 112. Lot 223 showed EPDs of BW 3.0, WW 60, YW 103, M 34, RFI -0.42, Eff 95 and MBT 100 and an ADG of 3.79.

Olson Cattle Co.’s consignments lots 284, 282 and 283 posted a WDA of 3.59, 4.27 and 3.95, respectively. The bulls were sired by HA Cowboy Up 5405 and came from St. Ignatius, Mont.

Lot 284 has EPDs of BW 0.8, WW 51, YW 90, M 24, RFI -1.26, Eff 112 and MBT 113.

Next, lot 282 has EPDs of BW 3.7 WW 81, YW 148, M 16, RFI -1.19, Eff 97 and MBT 110, and lot 283 has EPDs of BW 4.7, WW 84, YW 140, M 19, RFI -0.13, Eff 99 and MBT 108.

The Angus World Champion Pen of Three was consigned by Deppe Angus of Waverly, Iowa. Lot 267 was sired by VAR Discovery 2240 and has an ADG of 4.3 and WDA of 4.05. He also has EPDs of BW 4.3, WW 85, YW 161, M 31, RFI 0.13, Eff 105 and MBT 118.

Lots 251 and 250 were sired by AAR Ten X 7008 S A#. Lot 251 has an ADG of 4.07, WDA of 3.66 and EPDs of BW -0.1, WW 52, YW 94, M 27, RFI 1.30, Eff 95 and MBT 109 while lot 250 has an ADG of 3.91 and WDA of 3.73 and EPDs of BW 4.5, WW 67, YW 118, M 21, RFI -3.09, Eff 133 and MBT 113.

Look for the Angus bulls on pages 13-92 in the Midland Bull Test Catalog. Full results are available at midlandbulltest.com. 

The quality of this year’s South Devon breed at the Midland Bull Test was hard to match, as MJB Ranch in Lodge Grass, Mont. brought a group of bulls that posted top scores, sweeping the leaderboards for the breed in both average daily gain (ADG) and weight per day of age (WDA). 

According to the Midland Bull Test catalog, exciting new research from the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center “shows the South Devon sired females to be the number one breed for efficiency on a high roughage ration.”

“This, added to the tons of research showing a 23 percent advantage for crossbred females, makes these South Devon bulls a great cross on any breed,” continues Midland Bull Test. “This leads to more sustainable profit for the commercial producers.”

Midland Bull Test adds that, while a hot, dry summer affected the 205-day weights on this group of bulls, “their EPDs are excellent.”

The average EPDs for the South Devon bulls at Midland were BW 2.38, WW 55, YW 100 and M 31.7.

The South Devon bulls are slated to sell on April 5, following the Red Angus. They are represented by lots 850 through 899.

ADG leaders

Lot 870 topped the South Devons, with a final ADG of 3.93 and ADG ratio of 123. The son of MMM Untouchable W810 also has a WDA of 3.13 and EPDs of BW 2.1, WW 52, YW 93, M 31, RFI 0.15, Eff 104 and MBT 110. 

Then, lot 852 took second in the category, with a final ADG of 3.84 and ADG ratio of 120. He also posted a WDA of 2.86 and the son of DLC Royal LAD 1139 has EPDs of BW 2.6, WW 47, YW 88, M 29, RFI -0.95, Eff 106 and MBT 106. 

A DLCC Sure Thing Too 119T son, lot 896, tied with another MMM Untouchable W810 son, lot 869, for third and fourth, with a final ADG of 3.78 and ADG ratio of 118.

Lot 896 also has a WDA of 3.18 and EPDs of BW 4.8, WW 63, YW 106, M 28, RFI -0.57, Eff 110 and MBT 110, while lot 869 showed a WDA of 3.12 and EPDs of BW 1.8, WW 58, YW 92, M 58, RFI -0.35, Eff 101 and MBT 108. 

Rounding out the top five was lot 880, with a final ADG of 3.62 and ADG ratio of 113. He also showed a WDA of 2.98, and the MJB Country Cool 535C son has EPDs of BW -1.2, WW 44, YW 84, M 34, RFI 0.71, Eff 99 and MBT 97. 

WDA leaders

Lot 857 led the South Devon bulls with a WDA of 3.27. He is a son of DLC Royal Lad 1139 and has a final ADG of 3.53 and ADG ratio of 111. He has EPDs of BW 1.3, WW 60, YW 109, M 35, RFI 1.04, Eff 99 and MBT 109. 

Next, lot 896 also placed second for WDA with a score of 3.18. The DLCC Sure Thing Too 119T son has EPDs of BW 4.8, WW 63, YW 106, M 28, RFI -0.57, Eff 110 and MBT 110

Lot 868 took the third place slot for WDA, with a WDA of 3.17. A son of DLC Royal Lad 1139, he has a final ADG of 3.3 and ADG ratio of 103. His EPDs are BW 0.9, WW 62, YW 107, M 37, RFI 1.87, Eff 94 and MBT 104. 

In fourth was lot 876, a son of Cimarron Defender 443B with a WDA of 3.14. He also has a final ADG of 3.42, ADG ratio of 107 and EPDs of BW 2.4, WW 53, YW 98, M 27, RFI 1.65, Eff 101 and MBT 104. 

Rounding out the category was lot 870, with a WDA of 3.13. His final ADG was 3.93, ADG ratio of 123 and EPDs are EPDs of BW 2.1, WW 52, YW 93, M 31, RFI 0.15, Eff 104 and MBT 110. Lot 870 is a son of MMM Untouchable W810. 

Look for the South Devon bulls on pages 106-110 in the Midland Bull Test Catalog. Full results are available at midlandbulltest.com.