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As the world becomes an increasingly smaller place, economists note that globalization cannot be stopped, yet it offers benefits to the agriculture industry. 

“When we talk about globalization, we are talking about the increased flow of goods, services, labor, capital, technology, information and ideas at the global level and across country boundaries,” says University of Wyoming International Programs Director and Outreach School Associate Dean Anne Alexander. 

With globalization increasing, there are challenges producers must deal with and benefits that can be gleaned from working in global markets.

Importance of globalization

Alexander highlights two main reasons that globalization has importance and significance for agriculture.

“Global markets are the best way to grow a market,” she says. “Finding good trading partners – not necessarily just the countries and governments, but the people producers can work with in a country – is important.”

Agriculture provides additional challenges in the extra rules and regulations required to trade in the global marketplace, meaning that good partners are vital to market access.

“When we look at many agricultural goods, their prices are like oil – set in a global market,” Alexander says. “Even if a producer’s market isn’t outside the U.S. and even if they aren’t selling to global customers, an awareness of the things that can impact the global environment is really important.”

Alexander strongly recommends that producers stay on top of what is happening in the world around us to give them the edge in the marketplace.

“Regardless of whether a producer wants to get into the business of international trade or exploring new markets, it is important for them all to take a look at things that may disrupt global markets,” she said.

Impacts on markets

A wide array of situations can impact global agriculture markets, whether directly related to agriculture or not.

“For example, the situation in Ukraine, Crimea and Russia is having a massive impact on wheat markets,” says Alexander. “What will that do in the long-run to grain and other crops that affect livestock markets?”

Though events don’t seem like they would or should impact agriculture, she says that producers should pay attention to all major events happening worldwide.

“Most producers already know that they should pay attention to what is going on in other parts of the world,” Alexander comments.

Response effects

An additional impact of conflict, such as the current situation between Ukraine and Russia, is the response that other countries have.

“The interesting thing to watch with this situation is the European response,” she notes. “Will there be any trade sanctions that Europe puts on Russia?”

While the U.S. only sees about three percent of its trade with Russia, there could be ancillary effects.

“If there are sanctions by Europe, there could be expanding demand from Europe on goods,” says Alexander. “Ukraine has been the breadbasket of Europe, so that could have an impact.”

Countries of concern

Alexander notes that two regions are of increasing importance as we move into the immediate future – the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) countries and countries involved in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

“The TPP has such an immense membership,” she says. “Some of those countries are really good matches for many of the goods across the U.S., as far as ag products go.”

Additionally, there are possibilities with the TPP in Australia and New Zealand.

The increasing tensions between Japan and China may also have long-term impacts.

“There have been increased tensions between those countries over the past few months,” she notes. “While a lot less hot than with Russia and Ukraine, there are tensions that could genuinely disrupt trade, as well.”

NAFTA

“NAFTA has really opened up a lot of trade with Canada, and we are looking at ways to expand exports into Mexico,” Alexander comments, noting that recent activity between NAFTA countries regarding trade continue to impact both countries. 

Mexico, adds Alexander, provides a particularly interesting case.

“On average, the typical Mexican citizen has become much better off in the past 20 years,” she explains. “They have a growing middle class, and it’s an interesting export market.”

“Both the TPP countries and Canada and Mexico are particularly important right now,” Alexander emphasizes.

Unstoppable force

“The top point that I’d like to make is, we can’t stop the process of globalization,” Alexander comments. “It is already unfolding.”
Globalization, she adds, is a process that can only be halted or slowed by war. 

“Even war wouldn’t necessarily stop globalization because we don’t react the way we used to,” she says. “We don’t tend to become incredibly isolationist.”

“Globalization is in play. It is a process that has no heart or human behind it,” says Alexander. “People must recognize that globalization is here, and we need to work with it.”

Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..



As the world becomes an increasingly smaller place, economists note that globalization cannot be stopped, yet it offers benefits to the agriculture industry. 

“When we talk about globalization, we are talking about the increased flow of goods, services, labor, capital, technology, information and ideas at the global level and across country boundaries,” says University of Wyoming International Programs Director and Outreach School Associate Dean Anne Alexander. 

With globalization increasing, there are challenges producers must deal with and benefits that can be gleaned from working in global markets.

Importance of globalization

Alexander highlights two main reasons that globalization has importance and significance for agriculture.

“Global markets are the best way to grow a market,” she says. “Finding good trading partners – not necessarily just the countries and governments, but the people producers can work with in a country – is important.”

Agriculture provides additional challenges in the extra rules and regulations required to trade in the global marketplace, meaning that good partners are vital to market access.

“When we look at many agricultural goods, their prices are like oil – set in a global market,” Alexander says. “Even if a producer’s market isn’t outside the U.S. and even if they aren’t selling to global customers, an awareness of the things that can impact the global environment is really important.”

Alexander strongly recommends that producers stay on top of what is happening in the world around us to give them the edge in the marketplace.

“Regardless of whether a producer wants to get into the business of international trade or exploring new markets, it is important for them all to take a look at things that may disrupt global markets,” she said.

Impacts on markets

A wide array of situations can impact global agriculture markets, whether directly related to agriculture or not.

“For example, the situation in Ukraine, Crimea and Russia is having a massive impact on wheat markets,” says Alexander. “What will that do in the long-run to grain and other crops that affect livestock markets?”

Though events don’t seem like they would or should impact agriculture, she says that producers should pay attention to all major events happening worldwide.

“Most producers already know that they should pay attention to what is going on in other parts of the world,” Alexander comments.

Response effects

An additional impact of conflict, such as the current situation between Ukraine and Russia, is the response that other countries have.

“The interesting thing to watch with this situation is the European response,” she notes. “Will there be any trade sanctions that Europe puts on Russia?”

While the U.S. only sees about three percent of its trade with Russia, there could be ancillary effects.

“If there are sanctions by Europe, there could be expanding demand from Europe on goods,” says Alexander. “Ukraine has been the breadbasket of Europe, so that could have an impact.”

Countries of concern

Alexander notes that two regions are of increasing importance as we move into the immediate future – the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) countries and countries involved in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

“The TPP has such an immense membership,” she says. “Some of those countries are really good matches for many of the goods across the U.S., as far as ag products go.”

Additionally, there are possibilities with the TPP in Australia and New Zealand.

The increasing tensions between Japan and China may also have long-term impacts.

“There have been increased tensions between those countries over the past few months,” she notes. “While a lot less hot than with Russia and Ukraine, there are tensions that could genuinely disrupt trade, as well.”

NAFTA

“NAFTA has really opened up a lot of trade with Canada, and we are looking at ways to expand exports into Mexico,” Alexander comments, noting that recent activity between NAFTA countries regarding trade continue to impact both countries. 

Mexico, adds Alexander, provides a particularly interesting case.

“On average, the typical Mexican citizen has become much better off in the past 20 years,” she explains. “They have a growing middle class, and it’s an interesting export market.”

“Both the TPP countries and Canada and Mexico are particularly important right now,” Alexander emphasizes.

Unstoppable force

“The top point that I’d like to make is, we can’t stop the process of globalization,” Alexander comments. “It is already unfolding.”
Globalization, she adds, is a process that can only be halted or slowed by war. 

“Even war wouldn’t necessarily stop globalization because we don’t react the way we used to,” she says. “We don’t tend to become incredibly isolationist.”

“Globalization is in play. It is a process that has no heart or human behind it,” says Alexander. “People must recognize that globalization is here, and we need to work with it.”

Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..


SIDEBAR:

Getting involved

For any small business, the question of how to get involved in a global marketplace is a big one, says UW’s Anne Alexander.

“The first step is huge,” she adds. “Where do I go? What market do I look at? There are lots of questions.”

Alexander notes that Wyoming offers a number of resources to help producers get started.

“The Wyoming Business Council has amazing resources to help people figure out where the best fit is for them,” she notes. “They also have really good, basic tools to help people think through where good markets are, where they should be looking and how to come up with a global market strategy.”

The Wyoming Department of Agriculture and UW Extension are also good resources with access to small business tools for producers to utilize.

“How do we eat an elephant? One bite at a time,” Alexander says. “Those organizations can provide good advice on the first bite.”

 

On Oct. 2, Wyoming Business Council Livestock Genetics Program Manager Scott Keith and producers Kim Cullen and Greg Addelman set off on an eight-day trip to Argentina, which was filled with tours and educational presentations.
    “It was a great trip,” comments Keith. “The area we were in was different than I had visited before, and there were a lot of purebred breeders that are raising and providing genetics to the Patagonia region.”
Producer education
    As a significant component of their visit, Keith, Cullen and Addelman attended a national livestock show in Argentina at the city of Bahía Blanca.
    “We were in the southern part of Buenos Aires province at Bahía Blanca – the city that is called the gateway to Patagonia,” explains Keith. “We were very well received at the show.”
    Cullen and Addelman conducted workshops at the show, as well, to educate Argentinian producers about Wyoming cattle production.
    “Kim did a fantastic job,” says Keith. “She talked about some of the cows and talked about what she liked and what she would do differently. Then, she went into the trade show and sat down with producers to talk more about her cattle.”
    Keith notes that producers were intrigued by genetics options from Wyoming.
    “Greg did a demonstration that looked at the bull side of things,” he continues. “Greg talked about what our systems look for and what we do differently from a fitting standpoint.”
    With large crowds at both presentations, Keith says the information was well received and the Argentinians were well prepared for the visit.
Production tours
    The Wyoming group also participated in a variety of tours, looking at livestock operations, farms, feedlots, genetics businesses and a university.
    The tours were hosted by Ricardo Cantarelli, Cabana la Argentina at Col. Pringles, Alejandro Spinella, Cabana Don Romeo at Ollivaria, commercial and show bull producers from the Buenos Aires province, and Joaquin Ferreria, veterinarian from San Martin de los Andes, Neuquen province.  
    “They are really doing a lot to improve their operation,” comments Keith. “They are looking to raise between 200 and 300 commercial bulls to sell and build Argentina’s genetics.”  
    Cabana Don Romeo is home of the 2012 Palermo Champion Bull, the largest cattle show in Argentina.
    The first visit was Banco Genetico La Legua, a genetics company managed by Gonzalo Scazzola and Damian Sanso, which yielded insight to the burgeoning genetics industry in Argentina.
    Clovis Argentina, S.A., the feedlot operation, has a capacity of about 1,500 head, all of which are also raised on the ranch. Guiseppe Neri serves as president of the operation.
    “We also visited another operation on the coast that is strictly commercial Red Angus called Estancia El Palomar,” he said. “They raise breeding stock and graze on land similar to Nebraska’s Sandhills.”
    The operation is run by Mariano Martinez and utilizes native grass, as well as oats for grazing. Their native pastures have been developed by broadcast seeding, to introduce more variety.
    The similarities in environments made the trip provide some valuable learning opportunities.
Ag exchange
    In an attempt to set up continuing educational opportunities, the group also visited the Universidad Nacional del Sur, or the National University of the South.
    “We went to the university and met with the head of their Animal Science Department, an Extension educator and the head of the International Studies Department,” comments Keith. “We are going to set up a protocol for a program to provide three different levels of student exchange.”
    The first level of exchange would be two to four week intensive course involving both classroom work and a ranch practicum experience.
    “The second level would be an internship program where students could spend three to six months on several ranches,” he explains. “The third part would be an exchange, not necessarily working with students, but an effort to host tours.”
    Steve Paisley, UW Beef Extension Specialist, will be spearheading efforts on this end.  
Looking forward
    Exchange efforts with Argentina are far from over, notes Keith, who adds that a number of trips are already in the planning stages.
    “We are looking into doing another reciprocal exchange of travelers to the National Western Stock Show in Denver again, as well as the next opportunity to take a larger group to the Patagonia region to another show in March,” says Keith.
    He adds that Addelman and Cullen are also working to develop genetics programs, including both semen and embryos, for consideration by the Argentines for the next breeding season.
    “Some of their genetics would also be worthwhile to see how it would work here,” Keith says, “but we are still working on those options.”
    Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Casper — Over a five-week period, according to Livestock Marketing Information Center (LMIC) Director Jim Robb, the global recession took $6 per counterweight off the price of fed cattle.
    Robb was among the speakers at the Range Beef Cow Symposium held early December in Casper. “That came right back to what was bid for your calves,” said Robb to ranchers attending the conference. He noted that the two largest drivers in the feeder cattle market are corn prices and the fed cattle market. The link between the international marketplace and fed cattle prices is becoming increasingly strong.
    “The international credit crisis immediately hit this industry last year,” said Robb.
    Exports in 2010, according to Robb, are going to be slightly below 2009. It’s not a factor of demand, but of supplies. “Our cowherd is shrinking and we’re not going to have the base to export on a tonnage basis,” he said. The United States isn’t alone when it comes to declining cow numbers. Robb said a similar situation is taking place in the world’s other top beef producing nations.
    Looking back just a few years, Robb said three million head of feeder cattle were entering the U.S. from Mexico. That number is now half its historic high with an anticipated 1.5 million head in 2009. Mexico, currently amidst economic turmoil, is the United State’s biggest market followed by Canada, Japan and Korea.
    The U.S. beef industry, along with agriculture in general, is a bright spot in the American economy. Agricultural exports have a positive net value to the U.S. economy. Robb said the U.S. exported a billion more dollars in beef than was imported in 2009. Importing more than the country is exporting, he explained, causes a decline in the value of the U.S. dollar.
    A lower value dollar can enhance the ability to export agricultural products. On the flip side, Robb pointed out that it can also drive input costs such as fertilizer.
    Of the seven million metric tons of beef traded in the world annually, Robb said one million of it is U.S. beef. “There certainly is room for the U.S. to grow.” Of all the beef raised in the United States, seven percent is exported.
    Robb stressed the importance of non-meat items to the U.S. beef industry. Hides, tallow, greases and more add value to the industry. Of the $6 billion in U.S. beef exports last year, he said nearly half was non-meat items.
    “As the world income improves, our foreign markets are going to become more like the U.S.” Much like the U.S., Robb said, “Convenience will become a major issue for our foreign products.” The product transition we’ve seen at home, said Robb, will be expected at the international level as well. “Just because we do a good job producing, it doesn’t mean they’re going to buy it. Supply doesn’t create demand. You have to work to create demand in foreign marketplaces. It’s a long, slow process.”
    “It’s important to remember that the world population growth is slowing, but by 2050 we’ll have to have 33 percent more people. India will surpass China as the world’s largest country and there will be 100 million more people in the United States.”
    If the growing population seeks a normal nutritional level, Robb said the demand for animal protein will double in the years ahead.
    Jennifer Womack is staff writer for the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

After being appointed to American Farm Bureau’s Trade Advisory Committee while serving on the organization’s Board of Directors, Wyoming Farm Bureau President Perry Livingston traveled to Geneva, Switzerland and Brussels, Belgium with a delegation of seven others to explore international trade issues faced in agriculture. 

“We’ve always felt that it was important that we try to get as many people involved in world trade as possible,” Livingston comments. “This year, we had the opportunity to travel abroad and visit with a number of different people.”

The delegation of farmers and ranchers had the opportunity to meet with a number of officials, including World Trade Organization (WTO) Director General Roberto Azevedo, the WTO Director of Agriculture and Commodities and trade ambassadors from Brazil, Japan, Australia, India, China and Canada.

WTO experience

After arriving in Geneva on Sept. 15, Livingston notes that the group met with U.S. Ambassador Michael Punke, who also serves as Deputy United States Trade Representative, United States Trade Representative Deputy Chief Chris Wilson and the U.S. Mission Agriculture Minister and Senior Attaché. 

“We went over the issues they were facing at that time,” Livingston says. “The top issue was the Bali Agreement.”

He explains the WTO met on Sept. 16, where India formally announced their withdrawal from an agreement reached in Bali, Indonesia in December 2013 because they weren’t satisfied with the language of the agreement. The withdrawal effectively blocked the agreement.

Livingston says, “India transitioned to a new government, and the new government wasn’t pleased with the verbage of the agreement. These unilateral agreements require all the countries of the WTO to agree before they go forward.”

The opportunity to be present when such a large event was taking place was exciting, he adds. 

“We talked about the issues they were concerned with,” Livingston comments. “It has a lot to do with stockpiling food for their poor.”

In addition to being in Geneva while the WTO met, Livingston notes they met with ambassadors from Canada, the European Union, Brazil, Australia and India. 

“We had these meetings scheduled long before the Bali agreement meetings were scheduled,” Livingston says. “When we met with the Indian ambassador, it had been less than 24 hours since her government backed out of the agreement.”

The opportunity to meet with the Indian ambassador was both unique and a great opportunity to understand the issues of other countries, he says.

Trade concerns

“Each country has different issues with the way the U.S. does trade with them,” Livingston says. 

Livingston comments that many countries are concerned with the current U.S. Farm Bill and support for insurance programs supported in the bill. 

“Of course, they also have the same support issues we have,” he explains. “It is a two-way street, though.”

In the European Union, he says they are protective of their farmers, and consequently, the countries have developed trade barriers to protect the ability of local farmers to remain in business. 

“I have never had much interaction with world trade issues on a day-to-day basis,” Livingston notes. “I found it extremely interesting to learn about concerns from their countries.”

Brussels

After three days in Switzerland, the  group traveled to Brussels, Belgium, where the European Union (EU) is headquartered. 

“There are 26 countries involved in the European Union, and they have an ag organization called Copa-Cogeca,” Livingston explains, noting that the organization includes farmers and cooperatives from across the EU. “The Secretary General from the organization is a corn and soybean farmer from southern France named Pekka Pesonen.”

Pesonen asked the advice of AFBF in dealing with GMOs. 

“They have much more radical groups of individual in the EU who oppose GMOs,” Livingston explains. “It was interesting to visit with him about the issues they face. They were looking for help in figuring out how to address GMO concerns.”

Livingston adds that it was interesting to work together with other countries to address similar issues as those we see in the U.S. 

Top priority

The eight board members from AFBF were well received during their trip, Livingston says.

“The eight of us were the largest delegation AFBF has ever taken to Geneva,” he comments. “It made an impression.”
Typically, when interest groups travel abroad, only two to three people are involved, but the larger number made an impact, both on U.S. officials and those from around the world. 

“This is something we take very, very seriously,” he says. “Trade is a big part of American agriculture.”

Trade talks

On returning to the U.S., Wyoming Farm Bureau President Perry Livingston attended an American Farm Bureau board meeting where they visited with a trade representative from New Zealand who further emphasized the importance of trade and trade agreements. 

“She wanted to share the message that the U.S. needs to understand the importance of the deal we make with Japan in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TTP),” Livingston says. “Japan is going to be the toughest country to negotiate with, and the deal we make will be the model for all countries in the TPP.”

He adds, “I didn’t realize until that point that the rest of the TPP talks hinge on what the U.S. and Japan hammer out.”

“There is a lot of new information out there, and lots of things I wasn’t aware of,” Livingston says. “I have been sharing that information with people I visit with. It has been very interesting, and it is very important.”

Eye-opening experience

After a weeklong international excursion with American Farm Bureau, Wyoming Farm Bureau President Perry Livingston says, “This trip was a wonderful opportunity, and it changed my opinion about trade.”

Livingston notes that exports are a very important part of the U.S. agriculture industry and the U.S. economy. 

“In 2009, our exports were $96.3 billion,” he says. “In 2013, exports had grown to $141 billion. Exports are growing at a very substantial rate.”

He further notes that one-third of agriculture’s outputs leave the country as exports. 

“Exports are a really big deal to everyone in agriculture,” he adds. “They affect everyone’s pocketbook.”

Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup. Send comments on this article to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  

Laramie – Matt Tripodi of Euro Monitor International looked at the value of agriculture exports, particularly looking at world-to-world exports, and the emergence of a global supermarket at the AgriFuture conference held in Laramie Oct. 16-18.
    “What we are seeing right now is a global supermarket,” Tripodi explained. “The volume curve is going up, and it is getting bigger is a fast way.”
World-to-world exports
    “World-to-world merchandise exports aren’t just food – it is everything you can pick up and touch,” explained Tripodi. “If you look at 1980, world-to-world trade was under $2 trillion. By 1990, it was moving it’s way to $4 trillion.”
    Moving into the 2000s, Tripodi added that exports increased even further, jumping nearly $16 trillion between 2003 and 2008.
    “In 2009, the worse economic collapse we have seen since the Great Depression happened,” he continued, “but in one year, by 2010, exports were nearly back up to 2008 levels.”
    By 2011, world-to-world exports topped $18 trillion, with further increases expected moving forward.
    “This year, global trade will only grow by 2.5 percent,” Tripodi said, “and we are hearing lots of talk about doom and gloom, but think about 2.5 percent of 18 trillion – these numbers are incredible.”
Ag products
    “From 1990 to 2011, ag products exports quadrupled,” said Tripodi, quoting World Trade Organization numbers. “The food component of this is about $880 billion dollars. This is record-setting stuff. Growth in exports is at an incredible level.”
    Records are continually set each year in ag exports, and Tripodi noted that preferential trade agreements facilitated the growth of the export market.
    “In 1990, we had about 60 preferential trade agreements in the world,” he said. “By 2012, that number had jumped to about 280. All of a sudden, trade started happening”
    Driving these trade agreements, he said, is population growth. As developing countries are seeing the need for increased food production, new doors are being opened in global trade.
    “We are freeing up trade with preferential trade agreements,” he explained.
    The U.S., he added, is one of the largest exporters in the world, with one out of every three acres of farmed land in the country being dedicated to trade.
    “In the next 15 years, we will see a 4.7 percent growth in trade,” he continued, “and prices are exceeding volume growth.”
Populations
    In just over eight hours, Tripodi said the population will grow a net of about 78,000 people.
    “Most of the growth is in Asia Pacific, the Middle East, Africa and Latin America,” he said. “Between now and 2020, 630 million people will be born in that part of the world, with only 50 million people being born in the rest of the world.”
    He continued to explain that growth in those developing areas of the world is very significant because populations are also gaining wealth.
    “Most of the people in developing markets could eat a lot more,” he said. “In developed markets, we are witnessing flat consumption rates – they aren’t consuming that much more on a volume basis.”
Continued expansion
    Developing markets are seeing increasing consumption rates, which Tripodi noted has huge implications for agriculture.
    “They have a hunger to eat,” he said. “The increase in per capita disposable income is also expected in Asia Pacific by 2020.”
    Looking at consumption, Tripodi said that packaged food consumption is increasing on a per capita basis, which results as disposable income continues to grow.
    “Asia Pacific is the fastest growing market in the world in actual value terms,” he noted. “From 2007 to 2011, Asia Pacific grew 20.5 percent in packaged food consumption.”
    The population of Asia-Pacific hits about 4.4 billion, explained Tripodi, adding that those people will see a predicted increase in disposable income of about $1,339 per capita. Roughly and conservatively estimated, he marked $4 trillion in extra disposable income, with 20 to 30 percent of that likely to be spent on food.  
    “That represents an additional $1.2 trillion spent on food in Asia-Pacific alone, and that’s a conservative number,” he said.
    “The reality of it is that this is the biggest business opportunity in the history of the world,” Tripodi emphasized. “We are a global supermarket with billions of people and hundreds of millions of people that are being born and need food. They need to go some place for food.”
    The same region of the world will see an increase in fresh food consumption. Fresh food encompasses everything from fruits and vegetables to fish, meat and eggs.
    “In 2011, Asia Pacific consumed 66 percent of all the fresh food in the world,” he cited, “and 80 percent of all growth and consumption of fresh food is going to come from that market.”
Exports looking forward
    “The new reality is, it is a rapidly shifting industry that is embracing a global marketplace,” he added, mentioning that large corporations are staying on the forefront of global trade and seizing the opportunities to expand.
    “McDonalds sees 66 percent of income from foreign markets,” he mentioned. “The revenues are in foreign markets.”
    He encouraged farmers and ranchers to continue to take advantage of opportunities in exporting, including embracing competition.
    “Competition comes with their products,” he said. “You should explore exporting.”
    With programs in the state of Wyoming and throughout the country for exporting education and continued knowledge building, Tripoli added, “It is not easy to export, but there are opportunities out there.”
    “The next three to five years look very compelling,” Tripoli continued. “It is good for producers and ranchers, and it is a good thing for agriculture.”
    Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..