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Hulett – Bryce Conzelman began his 4-H career showing sheep at county and state fairs when he was eight years old. He will be a senior at Hulett High School this fall and enjoys helping younger children become engaged with 4-H. 

“I try to get as many kids involved in 4-H as I can, especially in Crook County where our numbers are really down,” he states.

Market lambs

Conzelman raises his own market lambs and sells them to fellow 4-H members and prospective members. His market lambs originated from his brother’s sheep herd, a herd that Conzelman now manages. 

“Our sheep herd started from three to four bum lambs that my brother first bought, and it has just kept growing from there,” he explains. 

Conzelman mentions that even when adolescents want to be involved in 4-H but are unable to purchase a lamb upfront, he gives them the option of paying him back from their sale money of the lamb. 

His sheep herd now contains 48 ewes, and with this year’s lambs and rams, the herd size amounts to 85 head. 

Showing

Showing his sheep has been a large part of Conzelman’s life, and he has been successful with it. 

Last year at Crook County Fair, Conzelman was the overall champion for the ram, ewe and market lamb classes, as well as the champion in several sheep showmanship classes and market swine classes.  

“While I enjoy sheep the most because I like raising them and have them all year round, I have also shown steers for two years and pigs for the last 10 years,” comments Conzelman. “Most of my involvement and effort goes into sheep.”

“My favorite memory in 4-H is watching my sheep grow from lambs and continuously become better as they are yearlings,” he reminisces. “I also enjoy seeing how well they show at the county and state fairs.”

He adds, “It’s fun knowing all of the inputs that go into my sheep and then seeing the results of my efforts raising them.”

Skills

Conzelman attributes 4-H and FFA with helping him develop and improve on his business skills and being more comfortable with public speaking. 

“Selling market lambs in 4-H has helped me to figure out the best way to make a profit on my lambs and find producers where I can purchase other sheep to enhance the bloodlines within my own herd,” he describes. 

Conzelman is also a member of the Devils Tower FFA chapter. 

“Through 4-H and FFA, I’m able to meet a lot of kids and make friends, who, maybe even 10 or 15 years later, I will still know and be good friends with,” says Conzelman. 

Advice

When asked what advice he would pass on to younger and new members of 4-H, Conzelman replies, “I would tell them to not hold back on anything. If they are given an opportunity to do something they should not let that opportunity pass them by.” 

He adds, “Those kids should take the opportunity presented to them and see where it takes them. A lot of times they will miss out on those opportunities, and they can learn immensely from all the experiences that 4-H and FFA can give them.” 

Future plans

One opportunity that has been presented to Conzelman through 4-H is an internship in Iowa from a sheep producer. Conzelman purchased his market lambs from this producer for several years. 

“The guy I buy my market lambs from, Kolby Burch, wants me to do an internship next summer at his place, help him with all of his sheep and go to some more shows,” he says. “He’s going to teach me how he runs his operation and showing techniques, so I can gain more experience.” 

After Conzelman graduates high school, his plan is to do the internship in Iowa then attend classes in Torrington at Eastern Wyoming College to earn his welding and joining technology degree and a certificate in machine tool technology. 

From there, he plans to continue his education at an institution in North Dakota to pursue being a diesel mechanic. 

Madeline Robinson is editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Big Piney – Erica David has coached young showmen for years and recently consolidated her mentoring into a five-day session – the Champion Mindset Boot Camp. 

Having just completed its fourth year, 60 participants from across the Rocky Mountain West traveled to Big Piney June 18 – 22 for the camp, which focused on showmanship, community service and leadership. 

“I grew up showing livestock and learned so much from the experience,” says David, founder and head coach of the camp. “I think that there is no better place to grow up than in a show ring.”

More than a camp

Throughout its existence, Champion Mindset Boot Camp has shown campers how to better handle their show animal to optimize their performance in the show ring and assists them in developing their own techniques.

“We wanted to turn out some of the toughest showmen in the Rocky Mountain West, and we are really starting to see that,” says David proudly. 

This year, when the participants were not in the ring, they worked on community service projects, worked one-on-one with youth motivational speaker Travis Brown and attended a classroom session focused on the various aspects of raising show stock. 

“We give these kids the complete package. When they walk away from the camp, they are prepared to show this season and for the rest of their careers,” adds David. 

Community mindset

This year, the camp included a community mindset. Campers participated in two community service projects that benefited animals and humans.

“We wanted to help the kids understand that it doesn’t take much to make a big difference in some else’s life,” explains David. 

For the first project, campers crafted braided fleece dog toys that would be donated to animal rescue groups. They created over 300 toys during the camp. 

The second project was assembling emergency care packages for relief organizations.

“Many of the kids went the extra mile and gathered donations before camp from local businesses,” continues David. “We were able to make over 100 emergency care packages that contained travel sized toiletries and non-perishable food.”

David says these will go to local homeless shelters, SAFE projects and, hopefully, to Oklahoma to aid in the tornado relief effort. 

Developing leadership

In addition to cultivating leadership in the show ring, Champion Mindset Boot Camp encourages students to be leaders in every aspect of their lives. 

After meeting Brown, also known as Mr. Mojo, at a conference, David knew that he would be an auspicious addition to the boot camp.

“He is such a dynamic person,” says David of Brown. “I wanted to take his energy to camp to teach the kids beyond the techniques of showing an animal. These life lessons extend beyond the show ring. I wanted to push the curriculum to teach kids about sportsmanship and work ethic.”

“Brown teaches the kids it is okay to be confident and how to develop that confidence,” continues David. “He also teaches kids how to deal with success and to give back to their communities.”

After delivering his keynote address discussing how to be a leader, Brown hosted two workshops, working with participants individually. These sessions focused on teaching showmen how to believe in themselves so they will be confident in any situation. 

“As the camp continues to grow and expand, there is a strong possibility that Brown will come out again, but we are also looking at the possibility of bringing in more than one keynote speaker so the kids are exposed to as many leadership opportunities as possible,” adds David. 

Plans for growth

“We are really excited for next year, and we have a lot of great things in the works,” says David. “One of the programs we are developing is the Champion Mindset Scholarship.”

Between camps, a showman is highlighted monthly in consideration for the yearly $1,000 scholarship. 

This year, Ashley Davis of Big Piney was awarded the scholarship for her excellence in exhibiting leadership both inside the show ring and in life. She is the daughter of Amy Davis. 

“We would love to have more than one scholarship, so we could split it into age divisions,” adds David. “This way the younger kids can get excited about showing, and we could still recognize the seniors that are stepping up as leaders.”

There is also talk of expanding the camps into Colorado and Utah to reach more of the upcoming showmen with their cutting edge curriculum.

“We are constantly working on shaking up the curriculum,” says David. “I have spent the past year interviewing national judges to come up with a synthesized showmanship style.”

Kelsey Tramp is the assistant editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Afton – Call Aircraft Company was created when Reuel Call of Afton resolved to build an airplane suited for private or family flying in rugged mountain country. Call was an early aviation pioneer. Seeing an unmet need, he decided to fill it.

In 1942, when Reuel Call, his uncle Ivan Call and his brother Spencer Call sat down to design an airplane that would perform well in high mountain country, they could hardly have known history was in the making. 

At that time, World War II was raging in the South Pacific and Europe. The trio barely had enough materials to build the first prototype airplane. After the war, sustained production went into full swing at CallAir when steel, surplus engines and parts were available. 

Passenger planes 

The CallAir A-3 passenger plane was born from these modest beginnings. CallAir built about 50 A-3s, which became the mountain plane built for farmers and ranchers, coyote hunters and anyone needing to fly over the rugged Rocky Mountains.

The A-3 operated with an extra wide gear, 186 square feet of wing area and a 125-horsepower engine. It was advertised to take off in 500 feet or less, climb 1,000 feet the first minute and cruise at 105 miles per hour, with a service ceiling at 17,500 feet. The plane could seat three average-size people.

WWII test pilot and Reuel Call’s cousin, Barlow Call, joined CallAir after the war. His flying skills showed the world what the CallAir could do. He used the plane for hunting, herding wild horses, ferrying and measuring snow. He took off from remote mountain slopes and pastures and landed his plane on a dime. Like the CallAir he flew, Barlow Call is a legend.

In 1947, Kenneth Arnold from Boise, Idaho purchased a new CallAir. While flying his A-3 searching for a downed aircraft near Mt. Rainier in Washington, he sighted a series of bright lights skipping through the sky. Arnold was the first to use the words “flying saucers” when he reported his sightings. Arnold and his CallAir would become household words among UFO enthusiasts.

Snowmobile beginnings

The SnowCar was the predecessor to the snowmobile. It was a tri-ski, with two skis on the back and one in front, a steering wheel and mechanism. The cabin was enclosed and, in some cases, heated by the engine, much like an airplane. SnowCars used airplane engines, but the propeller, mounted on the back, pushed rather than pulled.

 Up to this point, anyone who wished to put skis on an airplane had to remove the wheels and attach skis to the axles. Reuel Call designed and built a cradle that fit around the tire. The airplane was dropped into the cradle and secured by snap-over straps and bungee cords to stabilize the ski in flight. This simple invention served as a great improvement for people utilizing aircraft during the winter.

 A 1950s ad for a CallAir SnowCar read, “For fast economical winter travel, buy a SnowCar.” 

At the time, a four-passenger 125-horse power model started at $1,985, while two-passenger models started at $1,550. The SnowCar weighed 450 to 550 pounds.

Utilized by park rangers and the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, the SnowCar was also used by ranchers, sportsmen and others.

 A rebuilt SnowCar is on display in the CallAir Museum in Afton.

Ag uses

In the 1950’s, CallAir converted it cabin plane into a crop-duster, or agriculture spray plane. The first of these, the A-5, rolled out of production in 1954. Over the next decade, about 170 A-5s and its big brother, the A-6s, were built.

 Reuel Call sold CallAir in the early 1960s. New owners Doyle Child and Ted Frome replaced the A-5s and A-6s with the CallAir A-9, a larger version of the previous crop-duster, and sold about 850 of these planes. Later, they built a bigger spray plane, the B-1, and sold about 35 of these high-performance planes.

 CallAir employed hundreds of residents in Star Valley starting in the 1940s. Workers achieved high skill levels working with metals, wood, fabric, fiberglass and paints. 

The factory is still in operation today, owned by Aviat Aircraft, Inc. Aviat is engaged in the development, manufacture and servicing of sport and utility aircraft sold under the Aviat trade names of Husky, Pitts Special and the Eagle II.

For more information log onto aftonwyoming.net/index.cfm?ID=25. Echo Renner is a correspondent for the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and may be reached at 307-250-9723 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Afton – Call Aircraft Company was created when Reuel Call of Afton resolved to build an airplane suited for private or family flying in rugged mountain country. Call was an early aviation pioneer. Seeing an unmet need, he decided to fill it.

In 1942, when Reuel Call, his uncle Ivan Call and his brother Spencer Call sat down to design an airplane that would perform well in high mountain country, they could hardly have known history was in the making. 

At that time, World War II was raging in the South Pacific and Europe. The trio barely had enough materials to build the first prototype airplane. After the war, sustained production went into full swing at CallAir when steel, surplus engines and parts were available. 

Passenger planes 

The CallAir A-3 passenger plane was born from these modest beginnings. CallAir built about 50 A-3s, which became the mountain plane built for farmers and ranchers, coyote hunters and anyone needing to fly over the rugged Rocky Mountains.

The A-3 operated with an extra wide gear, 186 square feet of wing area and a 125-horsepower engine. It was advertised to take off in 500 feet or less, climb 1,000 feet the first minute and cruise at 105 miles per hour, with a service ceiling at 17,500 feet. The plane could seat three average-size people.

WWII test pilot and Reuel Call’s cousin, Barlow Call, joined CallAir after the war. His flying skills showed the world what the CallAir could do. He used the plane for hunting, herding wild horses, ferrying and measuring snow. He took off from remote mountain slopes and pastures and landed his plane on a dime. Like the CallAir he flew, Barlow Call is a legend.

In 1947, Kenneth Arnold from Boise, Idaho purchased a new CallAir. While flying his A-3 searching for a downed aircraft near Mt. Rainier in Washington, he sighted a series of bright lights skipping through the sky. Arnold was the first to use the words “flying saucers” when he reported his sightings. Arnold and his CallAir would become household words among UFO enthusiasts.

Snowmobile beginnings

The SnowCar was the predecessor to the snowmobile. It was a tri-ski, with two skis on the back and one in front, a steering wheel and mechanism. The cabin was enclosed and, in some cases, heated by the engine, much like an airplane. SnowCars used airplane engines, but the propeller, mounted on the back, pushed rather than pulled.

 Up to this point, anyone who wished to put skis on an airplane had to remove the wheels and attach skis to the axles. Reuel Call designed and built a cradle that fit around the tire. The airplane was dropped into the cradle and secured by snap-over straps and bungee cords to stabilize the ski in flight. This simple invention served as a great improvement for people utilizing aircraft during the winter.

 A 1950s ad for a CallAir SnowCar read, “For fast economical winter travel, buy a SnowCar.” 

At the time, a four-passenger 125-horse power model started at $1,985, while two-passenger models started at $1,550. The SnowCar weighed 450 to 550 pounds.

Utilized by park rangers and the Wyoming Game and Fish Department, the SnowCar was also used by ranchers, sportsmen and others.

 A rebuilt SnowCar is on display in the CallAir Museum in Afton.

Ag uses

In the 1950’s, CallAir converted it cabin plane into a crop-duster, or agriculture spray plane. The first of these, the A-5, rolled out of production in 1954. Over the next decade, about 170 A-5s and its big brother, the A-6s, were built.

 Reuel Call sold CallAir in the early 1960s. New owners Doyle Child and Ted Frome replaced the A-5s and A-6s with the CallAir A-9, a larger version of the previous crop-duster, and sold about 850 of these planes. Later, they built a bigger spray plane, the B-1, and sold about 35 of these high-performance planes.

 CallAir employed hundreds of residents in Star Valley starting in the 1940s. Workers achieved high skill levels working with metals, wood, fabric, fiberglass and paints. 

The factory is still in operation today, owned by Aviat Aircraft, Inc. Aviat is engaged in the development, manufacture and servicing of sport and utility aircraft sold under the Aviat trade names of Husky, Pitts Special and the Eagle II.

For more information log onto aftonwyoming.net/index.cfm?ID=25. Echo Renner is a correspondent for the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and may be reached at 307-250-9723 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 


 

 

 


 

 

 

Cheyenne – Past the traffic lights and the legacy of Cheyenne Frontier Days in the capitol city of Wyoming, an individual may eventually drive upon a small barn full of knowledge, success and Paint Horses.
    The Z Ranch, owned and operated by Don and Vivian Beard, is located in Cheyenne, and Don and Vivian are more than husband and wife – they have been business partners in a Paint Horse ranch for the past 14 years.
    During those 14 years of business, the Z Ranch has specialized in training Paint Horses for the show ring. Halter and all-around horse/rider have become the main focuses of Don and Vivian, and they provide their knowledge and training capabilities for open horses, amateur and youth exhibitors. Over the course of their time with Paint Horses the duo has worked with over 20 Reserve World Champions and Reserve National Champions.
    The Beards also breed Paint Horses, and the foals born at the Z Ranch are marketed according to their training. Each foal that leaves the operation has been trained by Don and Vivian.  
    On a typical year at the Z Ranch, Don and Vivian have seven horses under the roof of their barn. They currently house three horses for amateur clients as well as a few prospect horses of their own.
    “We are running a small operation. Both of us have had large operations before, and where we are today we are able to manage everything on our own. Larger operations will need more employees,” says Don.
    Don and Vivian intend to keep the ranch small. By staying small they intend to breed quality Paint Horses, and they are also focused on helping their clients reach their show ring goals.
    “We will keep improving our stock. As the horses improve, we want to keep improving,” comments Don.
    Prior to running the Z Ranch, Vivian was a part of a 30-stall barn in southern California. Don has never left the Cheyenne area, but he contributed to a 20-stall barn. Although each of them was in different regions of the country, one aspect was very similar – their operations consisted of breeding World Champion and Reserve World Champion stallions.
    Neither Don nor Vivian started their careers with Paint Horses. Each of them started out with Quarter Horses, and Vivian’s experience in the American Paint Horse Association (APHA) began when she started training Paint Horses for a friend.
    “As I entered shows of the APHA, I realized that the people in the APHA are very family-friendly, easy to get along with, fun and competitive. We just continued down the road from there,” says Vivian.
    “I started working with Paint Horses when a friend of mine told me about some people selling a broodmare that was bred to a Paint stallion. I bought the mare, and never looked back,” adds Don.
    Each of them found a passion for the APHA. To accompany the passion they had acquired for the Paint Horse breed and the association, they became leaders as well. The pair currently serves as national directors for the APHA as the National Director and the Alternate National Director representing the state of Wyoming. Don is also able to judge for six associations.
    “When you go to a Paint Horse show there are always friends around. I can’t remember going to a show and having a bad time. It makes this the place to be. Beyond the quality of horse, there are really good folks there,” says Don.       
    Allie Leitza is an intern for the Wyoming Livestock Roundup from Pine Bluffs. Send comments on this article to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Paints celebrate 50 years
    In 2012 the American Paint Horse Association (APHA) is celebrating its 50th year of existence. Prior to the founding of the association, the Paint horse breed was an outcast among the other breeds and was considered inferior to the Quarter Horse, because it was suggested that the more white a horse had the more flaws it also had. Rebecca Tyler Lockhart founded the APHA in 1962. Her endeavors started at her kitchen table that year, and 250 horses were registered in the APHA’s rookie year. Today the association has nearly one million registered Paint Horses.



A quote attributed to Art Williams reads, “I’m not telling you it’s going to be easy. I’m telling you it’s going to be worth it,” and the Wyoming Cowboy Hall of Fame (WCHF) board of directors found the statement to be true as they selected their 2018 inductees the weekend of May 12.

The 501(c)(3) WCHF was formed for exclusively historical, cultural, literary and educational purposes. Their chief goal is “to preserve, promote, perpetuate, publish and document Wyoming’s rich working cowboy and ranching history through researching, profiling and honoring individuals who broke the first trails and introduced that culture to this state.”

WCHF plans to collect, display and preserve the stories, photos and artifacts of such individuals and anything else that will honor and highlight their contributions to our history.

Pursuing that goal, WCHF’s major ongoing project is to memorialize each honoree through a video interview. 

As that project comes to fruition, visitors to wyomingcowboyhalloffame.com can enjoy, in their own words, many of the life experiences – good, bad and ugly – through which the 186 men and women already honored there have carved their individual niches across the Cowboy State. Along with photos and biographies of every class inducted since 2014, there are currently 40 video interviews of those still living, and this year, WCHF will pursue videos of some of the deceased honorees as recalled and related by their descendants. Preserving these unique, personalized histories costs $500 each, and WCHF has committed to record another 50 this year.

In the Wyoming cowboy tradition of helping our neighbors, WCHF invites and encourages Wyomingites to contribute toward the preservation of this priceless living history. People can visit the Support Page on the WCHF website, or mail contributions designated for the video project to Wyoming Cowboy Hall of Fame, 16550 Highway 220, Casper, WY 82604. 

The Class of 2018, who will be honored in an induction ceremony in September includes numerous men and women from around the state. 

This year’s inductees include John “Mexican John” Marroquin and Clark Leroy “Clarkie” Reynolds of Campbell County, Gene Griffis and Harold “Smitty” Smith from Crook County and John “Charley” Borgialli and Oley Darlington from Weston County.

From Niobrara County, Kenny “KB” Ballard, Stewart “Sturdy” Sides, Jr. and Jesse York will be inducted, along with Richard Duane “Dick” Jarrard of Platte County and Afton D. “Babe” Green, Jr. and William C. “Chuck” Wilkinson of Goshen County.

Albany County inductees include Lawrence Atkinson, Francis “Bud” Orton, Donald “Donny” Robbins and Wales Wenburg.

From Converse County, John “Jack” Fitzhugh and Mike Henry will be inducted. Natrona County inductees include the “B.B.” Brooks and McCleary Family, inducted as one. This family will include “B.B.” Brooks, Mary Naomi (Willard) Brooks, Lena Natrona (Brooks) McCleary, Marion Wilson “Mike” McCleary and Bryant Bascum “Cactus” McCleary. 

Harry Harriman (H.H.) “Jim” Price and Frank Shepperson will also be inducted from Natrona County.

Bernard “Bear Tracks” Betz of Johnson County will be inducted, and, from Sheridan County, Charlie “Chaz” Cook and Carl Johnson will join the ranks of the WCHF.

Curtis “Ray” Hammond, Frank Lee Martinez and Morris McCarty will be recognized from Park County, and Washakie County”s Louis “Louie” Rankine will be inducted into the WCHF.

From Carbon County, Leland Ward “Buck” Alameda, Eldon “Pete” McKee and Raymond “Ray” Waliser will be inducted, and Mary A. “Mickey” Thoman of Sweetwater County will be inducted into the Hall of Fame. 

Stanley “Henry” Pennoyer, Charles “Charlie” Shaffer and John Norman Wallingford of Hot Springs County and John E. “Jack” Brodie, Lonnie “Nav” Mantle and Albert Jerome “Stub” Farlow of Fremont County will also be inducted.

Lincoln County’s Charles Powers “Charley” Noble and Ronald “Ron” Stoltenberg, as well as Uinta County’s Harold Harvey, and Joe Hickey will be recognized in the Class of 2018. From Sublette County, Joseph “Joe” Black Chrisman, Sidney Ross “Sid” Skiver and Elbert and Hazel Walker will be recognized. Teton County cowboys Earl Hardeman and Donald K. “Bill” Scott will also be inducted into the WCHF.

The WCHF Induction Ceremony will be held at the Ramkota Hotel and Conference Center and the Casper Events Center Sept. 22-23.

Visit facebook.com/WyomingCowboyHallOfFame for more information and updates.