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The Make-A-Wish Foundation runs out of a central office in Casper, and their staff of five works hard to accomplish their goals and meet the needs of young people through the state who qualify for a wish.

“As a staff of five, it would be nearly impossible for us to cover the entire state and reach all the children who are referred to us,” says Tess Kersenbrock, community relations coordinator with Make-A-Wish Wyoming. “Without volunteers, we would not be able to grant Wyoming wishes.”

Volunteer roles

Most of the volunteers with Make-A-Wish are called wish granters. Wish granters work directly with families.

“Our volunteers do the initial meeting with families, which we call a wish visit, to get to know the family and the child a little better,” Morgan Legerski, Make-A-Wish Wyoming CEO, says. “They talk through the paperwork and visit with the child about what their wish is or help them brainstorm ideas for their wish.”

Volunteers also help in coordinating wish enhancements, which are extras added by Make-A-Wish Wyoming to make the child’s wish special.

“We always try to do something fun, which we call a wish enhancement,” Legerski comments. “It might be a send-off party or a limo ride to the airport, but our volunteers are important in helping to coordinate those things.”

Volunteers also donate their time and skills to help Make-A-Wish Wyoming raise funds necessary to grant wishes.

Legerski adds, “We wouldn’t be able to grant 35 wishes a year in Wyoming if we didn’t have volunteers. It wouldn’t be possible.”

Becoming a volunteer

The volunteer process with Make-A-Wish Wyoming is straightforward, involving an application, interview, background check and training.

Kersenbrock comments, “Individuals over the age of 18 are able to volunteer.”

She further notes that wish granters or other volunteers who work with children must complete and application, interview with staff members and a background check, as well as several trainings.

“Beyond the basic requirement of becoming a volunteer, it is equally important that an individual is invested in our mission and willing to be creative,” Kersenbrock explains. “A wish is not a single experience but a life changing event. It is important that those who are interested in volunteering with our organization truly share this belief.”

Volunteers in Wyo

The 60 volunteers across the state of Wyoming all share a passion for Make-A-Wish, and they give their time to making wishes of seriously ill children come through.

“As a volunteer, we really get the fun part and the whole experience, getting to meet kids and their families and really exploring their life,” says Shantel Anderson, a volunteer from Laramie. “We get to find out what’s going on, how treatments are progressing and then get to delve into the fun of the wish.”

Bonnie Aksamit of Ranchester, another volunteer, adds, “It’s very rewarding to be a wish granter. It’s nice to do what I can to see kids’ wishes come true.”

Anderson adds that wish granters have the opportunity to help children determine what their wish will be.

“We coordinate and send that information into the office, and the ladies in Casper do the hard work of making the wish happen,” she says. “We get to be involved in the fun parts, putting the specials touches on, revealing the wish and putting on parties for them. This is the fun side.”

Ag connections

“According to statistics from our national office, we know we are not reaching about half of the eligible children in Wyoming,” Kersenbrock adds. “That means that for every referral we receive, there is a child we are missing.”

She continues, “Wyoming is a large, rural state, and it is because of our 60 volunteers across the state that wishes are possible.”

Anderson, who was raised in the ag industry, says, “There’s a lot of children who have wishes that relate to the ag industry. Kids want to ride horses, visit ranches or other things.”

“The ag community as a whole also tends to be very giving in nature, and they focus on being part of a community,” she says.

Need for help

With about 30 wishes pending in the state, Kersenbrock notes that the need for volunteers continues to grow.

She adds, “At this time, we are specifically looking for volunteers in Lander, Riverton, Rock Springs, Green River, Cody and Gillette, though we can benefit from new volunteers in every community.”

Aksamit explains that there are volunteer options available for people who have lots of time to spend with the program, as well as those who only have a few hours a year.

“In the last year, I’ve probably helped grant five or six wishes,” she says. “Normally, it’s closer to two or three, and for each wish, I spend 10 to 12 hours total with the families.”

She also comments, however, that there are opportunities to be involved in planning special events, helping with fundraising and other opportunities.

“Volunteering is really rewarding,” Aksamit notes. “It’s not a lot of time out of my day or my month or my year, but it’s really fulfilling to see kids’ faces light up.”

She also notes that it is important to have enough people to help out.

“I live in Ranchester, but I go as far as Buffalo to help grant wishes,” she comments. “If we go to a child’s home, there must be two wish granters, so more volunteers would be helpful.”

“It’s great to work with kids, and it’s fun to see what they wish for,” Aksamit adds. “Make-A-Wish is a really wonderful organization to be involved with.”

For those considering the chance to volunteer with Make-A-Wish, Anderson says, “Just go for it. There is nothing to lose by being a volunteer, and there are so many options for people to consider, depending on how much time they have. Everything makes a difference in these kids’ lives.”

Kersenbrock adds, “We especially want to thank those who help us and encourage others to consider giving their time and energy to Make-A-Wish Wyoming.”

This is part two of a three-part feature on Make-A -Wish Wyoming. Look for part three in the Dec. 3 paper, where we will look at one child's wish.

Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Make-A-Wish Foundation runs out of a central office in Casper, and their staff of five works hard to accomplish their goals and meet the needs of young people through the state who qualify for a wish.

“As a staff of five, it would be nearly impossible for us to cover the entire state and reach all the children who are referred to us,” says Tess Kersenbrock, community relations coordinator with Make-A-Wish Wyoming. “Without volunteers, we would not be able to grant Wyoming wishes.”

Volunteer roles

Most of the volunteers with Make-A-Wish are called wish granters. Wish granters work directly with families.

“Our volunteers do the initial meeting with families, which we call a wish visit, to get to know the family and the child a little better,” Morgan Legerski, Make-A-Wish Wyoming CEO, says. “They talk through the paperwork and visit with the child about what their wish is or help them brainstorm ideas for their wish.”

Volunteers also help in coordinating wish enhancements, which are extras added by Make-A-Wish Wyoming to make the child’s wish special.

“We always try to do something fun, which we call a wish enhancement,” Legerski comments. “It might be a send-off party or a limo ride to the airport, but our volunteers are important in helping to coordinate those things.”

Volunteers also donate their time and skills to help Make-A-Wish Wyoming raise funds necessary to grant wishes.

Legerski adds, “We wouldn’t be able to grant 35 wishes a year in Wyoming if we didn’t have volunteers. It wouldn’t be possible.”

Becoming a volunteer

The volunteer process with Make-A-Wish Wyoming is straightforward, involving an application, interview, background check and training.

Kersenbrock comments, “Individuals over the age of 18 are able to volunteer.”

She further notes that wish granters or other volunteers who work with children must complete and application, interview with staff members and a background check, as well as several trainings.

“Beyond the basic requirement of becoming a volunteer, it is equally important that an individual is invested in our mission and willing to be creative,” Kersenbrock explains. “A wish is not a single experience but a life changing event. It is important that those who are interested in volunteering with our organization truly share this belief.”

Volunteers in Wyo

The 60 volunteers across the state of Wyoming all share a passion for Make-A-Wish, and they give their time to making wishes of seriously ill children come through.

“As a volunteer, we really get the fun part and the whole experience, getting to meet kids and their families and really exploring their life,” says Shantel Anderson, a volunteer from Laramie. “We get to find out what’s going on, how treatments are progressing and then get to delve into the fun of the wish.”

Bonnie Aksamit of Ranchester, another volunteer, adds, “It’s very rewarding to be a wish granter. It’s nice to do what I can to see kids’ wishes come true.”

Anderson adds that wish granters have the opportunity to help children determine what their wish will be.

“We coordinate and send that information into the office, and the ladies in Casper do the hard work of making the wish happen,” she says. “We get to be involved in the fun parts, putting the specials touches on, revealing the wish and putting on parties for them. This is the fun side.”

Ag connections

“According to statistics from our national office, we know we are not reaching about half of the eligible children in Wyoming,” Kersenbrock adds. “That means that for every referral we receive, there is a child we are missing.”

She continues, “Wyoming is a large, rural state, and it is because of our 60 volunteers across the state that wishes are possible.”

Anderson, who was raised in the ag industry, says, “There’s a lot of children who have wishes that relate to the ag industry. Kids want to ride horses, visit ranches or other things.”

“The ag community as a whole also tends to be very giving in nature, and they focus on being part of a community,” she says.

Need for help

With about 30 wishes pending in the state, Kersenbrock notes that the need for volunteers continues to grow.

She adds, “At this time, we are specifically looking for volunteers in Lander, Riverton, Rock Springs, Green River, Cody and Gillette, though we can benefit from new volunteers in every community.”

Aksamit explains that there are volunteer options available for people who have lots of time to spend with the program, as well as those who only have a few hours a year.

“In the last year, I’ve probably helped grant five or six wishes,” she says. “Normally, it’s closer to two or three, and for each wish, I spend 10 to 12 hours total with the families.”

She also comments, however, that there are opportunities to be involved in planning special events, helping with fundraising and other opportunities.

“Volunteering is really rewarding,” Aksamit notes. “It’s not a lot of time out of my day or my month or my year, but it’s really fulfilling to see kids’ faces light up.”

She also notes that it is important to have enough people to help out.

“I live in Ranchester, but I go as far as Buffalo to help grant wishes,” she comments. “If we go to a child’s home, there must be two wish granters, so more volunteers would be helpful.”

“It’s great to work with kids, and it’s fun to see what they wish for,” Aksamit adds. “Make-A-Wish is a really wonderful organization to be involved with.”

For those considering the chance to volunteer with Make-A-Wish, Anderson says, “Just go for it. There is nothing to lose by being a volunteer, and there are so many options for people to consider, depending on how much time they have. Everything makes a difference in these kids’ lives.”

Kersenbrock adds, “We especially want to thank those who help us and encourage others to consider giving their time and energy to Make-A-Wish Wyoming.”

This is part two of a three-part feature on Make-A -Wish Wyoming. Look for part three in the Dec. 3 paper, where we will look at one child's wish.

Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Huntley — Dennis Wambolt’s dad moved to Huntley in 1968 after a farm he was renting in Morrill, Neb. was sold out from under him. Today Dennis and his sons Adam, Andrew and Mason continue to farm in the Huntley area, focusing on quality hay,corn and some wheat.
“We mostly raised sugar beets in those early days,” says Dennis.
“We would only put hay in our corners or small fields where we couldn’t irrigate. When everything else was done we’d do the haying. Now the first thing we do is our hay,” adds Andrew.
“We farm a lot of ground that neighbors used to farm but went out of business and left. We lease a lot of that ground. We put in sprinklers and help neighbors put in sprinklers. You can only raise what you can irrigate here,” explains Dennis.
The Wambolts irrigate using sprinklers and ditch water. Farmers can’t drill any additional irrigation wells in Goshen County and there isn’t any water in the ground where their farms are primarily located.
“Most of our water is Goshen Irrigation District (GID) water and they’re one of the best irrigation districts in the country. They do a really good job of delegating water for the entire year and ensuring every guy has what he needs. It’s worth a lot to have a really good irrigation district,” notes Dennis.
“Ditch water is as good or better than pumped water. It’s warmer and the silt and other nutrients in it are beneficial to crops. When you pump water it costs money and it’s very cold,” adds Adam.
However, one advantage to using sprinklers over flood irrigation is the timeliness of application they provide.
“By the time you get hay off a field you’ve used a week, so you have two weeks to irrigate then you have to give everything a week to dry out for the next cutting. You can’t get much done with flood irrigation because it takes so long. But a sprinkler will run over it in two days and won’t get it too wet,” explains Dennis.
“We would like to put in more sprinklers, but that’s pretty hard to do. It’s hard to plan for expenses with the economy the way it is right now,” says Andrew.
The Wambolts aim for four cuttings of hay annually, but sometimes have to settle for three due primarily to weather conflicts.
“It all depends on Mother Nature. Last year we were going to start cutting hay May 25 and it started raining. We didn’t start cutting anything until the middle of June. We’ve still got some of our fourth cutting hay in the field from last year because of the weather,” says Adam.
The Wambolts market their hay to a variety of customers, but their primary focus is dairies and ranchers.
“We’ve got some dairies we send our better hay to, and we have a lot of ranchers we sell round bales to. Ranchers like round bales and dairy guys like square bales, so we do both. I’ve got some pretty loyal rancher and dairy customers and they help us a lot.
“We try to work with our customers. The dairy guys had a bad year last year because milk prices were so low. They couldn’t afford to pay the big dollars for hay so we made it work,” explains Dennis.
“Our hay wasn’t as good last year, and their milk prices were low so it worked out for everyone,” adds Adam.
“One of the best things we’ve done for our hay deal is put in scales so we can weigh trucks right on the farm. That’s a huge advantage we have,” explains Andrew.
“We can sell hay any day of the week. A lot of people want to buy hay on the weekends and there wasn’t a place to weigh because everything was closed. If they call us knowing they can get loaded immediately it’s a good deal. If they can pay we will load them anytime,” adds Dennis.
“We’re in the market to sell hay. We want to sell as much as possible. When we have the opportunity to market some we better be able to. We also want to sell customers hay more than once,” comments Adam.
“We try to be agreeable, that’s the most important thing. When people find out they can come to you and be treated fairly they’ll come back. If you cheat them you’ll only do it once,” notes Dennis.
“And they will tell their friends and neighbors, either way,” adds Andrew.
The Wambolts currently market most of their corn to a local ethanol plant.
“Almost all of our corn goes to the ethanol plant right now. We did sell some to a few feedlots. Everybody around here wants a heavy, dry corn and we try to consistently produce that,” explains Dennis.
The Wambolts also utilize technology such as GPS and auto-steer on their equipment to increase efficiency.
“We use GPS that tells our exact location and helps us drive straight and can show how many acres we’ve covered,” says Adam.
“The auto-steer really helps with fertilizer application and allows us to get even coverage on a field. We don’t over- or under-fertilize. It also eliminates under or over-lapping, which makes us more efficient,” adds Andrew.
The Wambolts have practiced strip tillage, a form of minimum tillage, for 20 years and had one of the first strip till machines ever made.
“Basically, strip tilling is just tilling the land you’re going to farm as opposed to tilling and plowing everything up. You’re leaving trash, which protects the ground. When you plant corn and the seedlings start coming up there’s a lot of protection there. With bare ground the elements can get to your crop more easily and more erosion can occur. There are disadvantages, like the ground doesn’t warm up as fast, but for us the advantages outweigh the negatives,” explains Adam.
Both Adam and Andrew grew up farming with their dad and grandfather and plan to continue the family tradition.
“These guys have been helping since they were real little; doing anything you wanted them to. It was amazing to see what they could accomplish at a young age,” comments Dennis.
“It’s hard to walk away from everything we’ve built. My grandpa has farmed his whole life and my dad has too. We don’t want to just walk away,” explains Adam.
“We’ve been involved since we were little kids and I would much rather do this than sit at a desk or computer all day. It gives us a degree of freedom, too,” adds Andrew.
But both add that there are a low number of young people returning to the farm, especially in their area.
“We were at a Symplot meeting recently and Andrew and I were easily the youngest people there. The average age was older than my dad, and that’s the average age of the farmer today. With the Death Tax being reinstated next year, it’s not going to get any better, either. That would kill our chances to continue farming. We would have to sell everything just to pay the tax and that’s horrible,” says Adam.
“Another thing is the Cap and Trade. We’re already paying enough for energy, it’s one of our largest expenses and we’re taxed enough,” adds Andrew.
As for the future, all three men agree they would like to see a dairy brought into the area.
“They bring in and turn over a lot of money within a community. Just consider the jobs they would create. They buy hay and corn and produce milk and manure, both of which are marketable here,” explains Dennis.
“My grandpa always said new money comes from the land. Money starts on the farm and the farmer spends it in town and it’s turned over four or five times before leaving the community. No other industry does that,” says Adam.
Being well-informed and customer-oriented has created a successful farming enterprise for the Wambolts that Adam and Andrew plan to continue as long as possible. Dennis adds that there are a lot of wonderful people and marketing opportunities in the area that make it a great place to live and farm.
Heather Hamilton is editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kirby –Wyoming Whiskey was born when Brad and Kate Mead decided to diversity their 1,200-acre cattle ranch and obtained the first distillers license in the state of Wyoming.
After partnering with David DeFazio, Chief Operating Officer of Wyoming Whiskey, the Meads enlisted the help of Steve Nally from Kentucky to serve as master distiller and manager of the operation. Steve got his start in distilling at Makers Mark in 1972.
“I’ve done every job involved in distilling at Makers Mark,” says Steve. “I moved up to master distiller there in 1988, and did that for 15 years. In 2003, I retired.”
Steve’s wife Donna also worked at Makers Mark in the tour program for 27 years before retiring. When the Meads and DeFazio asked them to be a part of Wyoming Whiskey, the couple moved to Wyoming without hesitation.
“It was the chance of a lifetime to start a product from the ground up,” says Steve. “We developed the recipe, secured the grains and saw the building go up.”
“We are the first legal distillery to ever be built in the state of Wyoming, and we firmly believe we are the first bourbon distillery west of the Mississippi River,” explains Donna. “We are making bourbon whiskey the Wyoming way.”
To be called a bourbon whiskey, the product must meet a number of criteria. Bourbon can only be made in the United States, and the primary ingredient for the mash fill must be corn. The whiskey must be aged in a new white oak charred barrel, and each barrel is only used once. The fermented mash cannot be distilled over 160 proof and has to be barreled at less than 125 proof. To be called bourbon, no filtering that will alter the natural color or taste of the product can be done, and it must age at least two years.
Bourbon the Wyoming way means that all ingredients come from Wyoming. All the grains used in the product are grown in the area, and the water comes from Aqua Vista Springs in Manderson.
Donna explains that the grains used are corn, spring wheat and malted barley, and each was selected for its flavor. The second grain, known as the flavoring grain, is spring wheat, which was selected by Steve to replace rye, a more traditional flavoring grain.
While the barley is malted in a facility in Great Falls, Mont., the grain comes from Riverton and is shipped back to Wyoming Whiskey.
The whole-kernel grain is ground using a roller mill, as opposed to a hammer mill. Donna explains that a hammer mill introduces heat to the grain, altering the flavor. Limestone water provides the foundation of the sour mash, which starts the whiskey making process.    
“It’s a lot like making sourdough bread,” says Donna. “We save a little of the mash, called the starter, to add to the next batch.”
Starter is added to the water in a mash cooker and each of the grains is added at different temperatures, based on when the starches are released.
“We want as much starch as we can get, because that is where the alcohol comes from,” explains Donna.
The grains cook for about three-and-a-half hours before being transferred to large tanks with cooling coils, called fermenters. Every Monday Steve adds two strains of yeast he has selected to the fermenter, and for the rest of the week a sour mash yeast starter is used to start fermentation.
“We let it ferment for three to four days,” says Donna. “The yeast feeds on the natural sugars of the grain, converting the sugar to alcohol, generating heat and producing CO2. That is natural fermentation.”    
At the end of fermentation, the mash is referred to as “distillers beer” and has an alcohol content of about 11 percent. Out of 2,300 gallons of distillers beer in each batch, only 220 to 230 gallons of whiskey result.
The distillers beer is strained and the leftover grains are either kept to make the next mash or fed to cattle on the Mead ranch. The high protein content of the mash makes it an ideal feed source.
The beer enters a 38-foot-tall distillation column next. The column has an 18-inch diameter and 24 perforated copper plates. Vendome Copper of Kentucky custom-made the distilling equipment at Wyoming Whiskey, making it one of a kind. Steam evaporates the beer in the column, and the resulting vapor is cooled in a condensation column.
A second distillation in a pot-bellied still, known as the doubler, purifies the product further. From the doubler, vapors are condensed again to new, unfinished whiskey, which is about 130 proof, or 65 percent alcohol.
“It looks like cool water coming out of a spring,” says Donna. “Distillers refer to it as ‘white dog’ because it’s got a little bit of a bite.”
The proof is lowered to 110 using reverse osmosis, and the whiskey is put into 53-gallon white oak barrels for aging. The interior of the barrel is charred using a gas flame.
“When the whiskey goes in clear and gets hot in the aging warehouse, it expands into the wood. As it cools down, it pulls back out. That’s where we get the color and flavor of the whiskey.”
Each week Wyoming Whiskey fills about 30 barrels and puts them in an aging warehouse to mature.
While they never control the temperature of the warehouse, humidity is monitored, says Donna. Because of the low humidity in Wyoming, it is necessary to keep the warehouse at higher than 50 percent humidity to ensure the barrels don’t dry out or crack.
“The distillery has been in operation since July 2009 and runs four days a week,” says Donna. “We are running at full capacity. If we wanted to make more we would have to add more fermenters and run six days a week, but we’re not there yet.”    
Currently the Nallys are waiting for the whiskey to age before they can start bottling. Just over 2,300 barrels are in the warehouse now.
“Once it leaves the distillery and goes into an aging warehouse, it’s up to Mother Nature,” says Donna.
About every six weeks, Steve samples whiskey from a variety of barrels.
“He critiques the color, aroma, proof and taste to see how it is progressing in the maturation process,” says Donna. “Right now, it has good taste, and the color is very good, but it still has a good bite. We are picking up a caramel and a little bit of a nutty taste, as well as slight fruity taste.”
Because bourbon whiskey has never been distilled in Wyoming, there is no standard for how long it should be aged.
“It’ll be at least one more year until it’s ready,” says Steve. “Hopefully at the end of this year, we’ll be able to put a pretty firm date on it.”
As the whiskey ages, Wyoming Whiskey is preparing to choose a label and bottle design and is looking a procuring bottling equipment.
“We are very excited and can’t wait to get it to the market,” continues Donna. “There is a lot of interest.”
“This will be a truly hand-crafted, premium product,” says Steve.
Donna emphasizes, “Steve and I are both very passionate about the bourbon industry. But it’s not what you drink; it’s how you drink it. This is a sipping bourbon, not to be overindulged, but to be enjoyed.”
The people of Wyoming will have to continue to wait for a finished product.
“As we say here,” Donna comments, “It’ll be good and ready when it’s good and ready.”
Wyoming Whiskey can be reached online at wyomingwhiskey.com or by calling 307-864-2116. Saige Albert is assistant editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup and can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Worland – Since their formation in 1958, the Washakie County Cowbelles have remained active in the Worland and Ten Sleep areas, promoting agriculture and serving local agriculture organizations in a number of ways.

“The Washakie County Cowbelles was the eighth Wyoming county to organize as a group of Cowbelles,” says Kathy Bush, Ten Sleep rancher and long-time Cowbelle. “Six women from Ten Sleep organized and chartered the Washakie County Cowbelles.”

The first six members of the organization included Mrs. Ed Rice, Mrs. Fred Grant, Mrs. Ray Brown, Mrs. W.A. Waldo, Mrs. Harry Taylor and Mrs. J.S. Woosley.

On founding the group, the six ladies immediately began promoting Washakie County agriculture.

“At their first meeting, held Sept. 29, 1958, they first decided to design and make brand napkins,” continues Bush. “This project has grown, and we have had brand napkins ever since.” 

She adds, “We also have brand placemats, tote bags, scarfs, aprons and afghans.”

Continuing to grow

The Cowbelles have continued to steadily grow and develop since.

“At the beginning, the Cowbelles met twice a year – in the spring and summer,” Bush explains. “We now hold monthly meetings.”

She notes that the organization’s main purpose is to promote and educate consumers about beef.

“We promote and educate through holding cook-offs, giving away beef certificates, giving beef to 4-H, FFA, home economics classes and in Christmas baskets,” Bush says. “We also hold radio talks, ag expos and have floats in our local parades.”

The Cowbelles also cater a variety of luncheons, banquets and ag-related events, including WESTI Ag Days.

“We’re very active,” comments Danyne Six, the Cowbelles’ current secretary. 

“Every month, we try to do a new promotion,” Cowbelles President Betsy DeBolt comments. “For example, for Valentine’s Day, we will give away beef certificates, and in March, we have the ‘beef fairy,’ who buys corned beef in the grocery stores for folks who are shopping.”

The group also does a lot for Thanksgiving and Christmas by participating in food programs for needy families.

Supporting the community

The Cowbelles are also very active in Washakie County by supporting students through scholarships.

“With the money we raise by catering events, we give scholarships to students,” DeBolt says. “Our only requirement for scholarships is that the student be majoring in agriculture.”

“We give three to five scholarships each year to graduating seniors and college students for continuing education,” Bush says. “Students who are going to enroll in or are currently enrolled in ag–related majors can apply for those scholarships.” 

Six further notes that they are generous with their scholarships and provide many opportunities for students. 

Current membership

DeBolt notes that nearly 20 women are members of the organization, with more than half of those participating actively and regularly in the organization.

DeBolt serves as the Washakie County Cowbelles president, Sherry Brewster is the group’s vice president, Six serves as secretary, and Marlene Loudan serves as treasurer.

The members of the organization are all involved in some aspect of agriculture, whether that be cattle production, crop production or as an advocate of the industry. 

Continuing goals

“The Washakie County Cowbelles are a viable group and will continue to be very active into the future,” says Six. “We love serving beef, and we love teaching about beef.”

“We’re proud to promote beef because it’s a great product,” adds Six.

DeBolt says that the Cowbelles are important because of the role they serve to promote beef.

“We are promoting beef to consumers,” she says. “Beef is the best source of protein and iron out there, and it’s important that people know that. It is important to the U.S. and the world as a whole that people know how great beef is.”

“So many people have misconceptions that beef is bad for us, but that isn’t true,” DeBolt adds. “We will continue to promote beef every way we can.”

Saige Albert is managing editor of the Wyoming Livestock Roundup. Send comments on this article to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..