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The election is over, and we have a new President Trump. Some are happy and staying, some are disappointed and leaving, but most are just glad it is over. The sun will still rise tomorrow morning, and life will go on. It’s what we have always done after an election. America is known for two things, long presidential elections and having no shots fired during the transfer of power. The relinquishment of power and the handing over the reins of leadership to a new person has always been calm and orderly, something that doesn’t always happen in a lot of countries.

And so life does go on, and being involved, as a number of you are, in raising and providing food for our nation and some other countries, I always get nervous when I hear talk about a recession coming, especially in the food or restaurant business.

  Some analysts say the restaurant recession has arrived, and if it is true, that could be tough on places like Casper, where we seem to have a number of restaurants and plans for three or four more in the downtown area. We all like to have a choice of restaurants, and we hope the new ones, along with the established ones, all make a go of it.

Consumers are starting to grapple with rising costs, maybe not so much in Wyoming as in other states, and they are learning, with grocery prices coming down, that we need to take advantage of cheaper groceries and eat more at home. We certainly hope people are buying beef and lamb, especially beef. Beef producers are really hurting, as some say we have to eat our way out of the beef glut. There are a number of other reasons for the low beef prices, but large numbers of cattle is one of them.

A number of major investment companies have lowered their expectations for large restaurant companies. Stifel, which downgraded 11 restaurant stocks to sell last July, last week warned of the saturated and mature nature of the U.S. restaurant industry.

Along with other rising costs of living, there is also a rising cost of eating out, which has come just as grocery prices have gotten cheaper. The cost of food purchased for home use across America has fallen over 2.4 percent in the past year. As MarketWatch said, that is the biggest decline over a 12-month period since the end of the 2009 recession. Food at home has lowered about as much as food from restaurants has risen.

Hamburger, the biggest beef product, is down 8.8 percent from a year ago, despite a rare 0.8 percent rise in October. That, along with other lower meat prices, should help those in the restaurant business. Also, those in the restaurant business use a lot of imagination to lure us in to eat at their business. We just need to take advantage of those marketing ploys.

Restaurant operators are expected to increase the use of promotions and discounts to win back diners, further crimping earnings at a time when commodity costs are historically low. Commodity deflation has already created greater competition from our supermarkets, which are better able to pass higher costs on to the consumers.

So, just like in the livestock business, it is supply and demand. We know that all too well.

Election day is Tuesday of next week – Nov. 8, and if you haven’t already voted, you need to on Tuesday. Remember, the freedom to vote is one of the greatest rights you have, and it does keep America free.

Here at the Roundup, we try to stay out of politics. We report on those running for state and national office, but that is about the limit. I’m pretty sure everyone realizes those of us involved with the Roundup are conservative, as we’re all involved in agriculture one way or the other, and those in ag tend to be conservative, as you know. We’re proud of that. But we don’t tell people who to vote for in the Roundup. We feel that would be an insult to, first, your intellect, and, second, it is none of our business whom you vote for.

As the election draws near, we’ve been hearing people saying, “I’m not voting. I’m sick and tired of this election and those running for national office.” We can all sympathize with those folks, as nationally this election season has been a mess.

Nationally, we usually vote for someone or against someone, but this year, those running for president have really soured us on the election process. American presidents just don’t talk like this year’s candidates have publically.

Many of us have said, “How did we end up with these two?” or “How has America come to this?” No one seems to have the answer. Lately, there have been some big issues come to surface, but is anyone listening?

I see, as of Nov. 1, around 25 million voters have already voted. Good for them for voting, but they didn’t get to vote on the whole story. Basically, none of us have heard either candidate’s whole story. The only thing they talk about is how their opponent is just a crook. We haven’t heard much about policy or issues from either candidate.

To be truthful, a lot of us have just tuned out on the national election. Thank God there is lots of good sports on TV and good books and a great ag newspaper to read in our spare time. Just when you think it can’t get any worse, it does. But, one of them is going to be President of the U.S.

So, we have to take it seriously and vote for our choice for a number of reasons. By not voting, we are most likely giving the candidate we wouldn’t vote for an invisible vote, and by not voting, it is unfair to those candidates in our local and state elections that are all so important. Remember, we still have civility in our state and local elections, and hopefully that doesn’t change.

I think it is up to us as state and local voters to let it be known that Wyoming voters don’t want their elections to go the way the national elections have gone. Respect and civility are a part of who we are, and we don’t want our elections to take place in a mud pit.

As they say, “The line separating good and evil passes not through states nor between political parties either but right through every human heart.” Also remember free is not the same as free and easy.

So please vote, and just take some air freshener with you to the voting booth.

 

Election day is Tuesday of next week – Nov. 8, and if you haven’t already voted, you need to on Tuesday. Remember, the freedom to vote is one of the greatest rights you have, and it does keep America free.

Here at the Roundup, we try to stay out of politics. We report on those running for state and national office, but that is about the limit. I’m pretty sure everyone realizes those of us involved with the Roundup are conservative, as we’re all involved in agriculture one way or the other, and those in ag tend to be conservative, as you know. We’re proud of that. But we don’t tell people who to vote for in the Roundup. We feel that would be an insult to, first, your intellect, and, second, it is none of our business whom you vote for.

As the election draws near, we’ve been hearing people saying, “I’m not voting. I’m sick and tired of this election and those running for national office.” We can all sympathize with those folks, as nationally this election season has been a mess.

Nationally, we usually vote for someone or against someone, but this year, those running for president have really soured us on the election process. American presidents just don’t talk like this year’s candidates have publically.

Many of us have said, “How did we end up with these two?” or “How has America come to this?” No one seems to have the answer. Lately, there have been some big issues come to surface, but is anyone listening?

I see, as of Nov. 1, around 25 million voters have already voted. Good for them for voting, but they didn’t get to vote on the whole story. Basically, none of us have heard either candidate’s whole story. The only thing they talk about is how their opponent is just a crook. We haven’t heard much about policy or issues from either candidate.

To be truthful, a lot of us have just tuned out on the national election. Thank God there is lots of good sports on TV and good books and a great ag newspaper to read in our spare time. Just when you think it can’t get any worse, it does. But, one of them is going to be President of the U.S.

So, we have to take it seriously and vote for our choice for a number of reasons. By not voting, we are most likely giving the candidate we wouldn’t vote for an invisible vote, and by not voting, it is unfair to those candidates in our local and state elections that are all so important. Remember, we still have civility in our state and local elections, and hopefully that doesn’t change.

I think it is up to us as state and local voters to let it be known that Wyoming voters don’t want their elections to go the way the national elections have gone. Respect and civility are a part of who we are, and we don’t want our elections to take place in a mud pit.

As they say, “The line separating good and evil passes not through states nor between political parties either but right through every human heart.” Also remember free is not the same as free and easy.

So please vote, and just take some air freshener with you to the voting booth.

 

The month of November is about upon us, and it is time to, if you haven’t already, plan on what state conventions or meetings to attend over the next 40 days. As I’ve said time and time again, if you are in any kind of production agriculture, livestock, crops, marketing, government, both state and national or just have an interest, you need to belong to at least one of the related organizations and get involved by attending their meetings or conventions.

Our fall meetings have already started this past week with the Wyoming Water Association Annual Meeting and Educational Seminar. For those whose interest is mainly water, this is always an interesting meeting.

On Nov. 1-3, the 72nd Wyoming Weed and Pest Council Fall Conference and Business Meeting will be held in Cody. If you have issues with invasive species and pests or have an interest, this meeting is a must. The rooms are filled with numerous speakers on the subjects and most of those attending are youthful, high energy and very knowledgeable. From the legal aspects to the actual control, it can be found in the educations sessions on Nov. 2.

On Nov. 4-5, the Independent Cattlemen of Wyoming will meet at the Ramkota Hotel in Casper. The convention starts at lunch on Nov. 4 followed by a full afternoon of speakers on sustainable beef, state’s rights and public lands, with a banquet at 5:30 p.m.. The next morning is the general business meeting and committee reports.

Nov. 10-12 is the Wyoming Farm Bureau Annual meeting at the Hilton Garden Inn in Laramie. Business meetings will be held in the morning of Nov. 11, and that afternoon is the Standing Committee Meetings, ending with a dinner that evening. On Nov. 12, they will hold the General Session, speakers and election of officers. If you are interested or a Farm Bureau member, this is where to be.

The 23rd Wyoming Women’s Ag Symposium will be held on Nov. 10-11 at the Ramkota Hotel in Casper. This event is filled with speakers that address issues important to women in ag – and also the men in their lives. It is always very informational, fun and a time to visit with others.

The Wyoming Association of Conservation Districts 71st Annual Convention comes next on Nov. 15-17 in Riverton at the Holiday Inn. You need to be there if you are a District Supervisor or are involved with districts. The week starts with a Board of Directors meeting, then continues on to meetings and breakout sessions on Nov. 15. The general session starts on Nov. 16 followed by committee meetings, and the evening ends with a great social hour and fun auction. Nov. 17 is filled by concurrent sessions with numerous topics of interest and also on all days is a great tradeshow.

The Wyoming Section of the Society of Range Management is holding their annual meeting with the Wildlife Society, Wyoming Chapter in Cody at the Holiday Inn on Nov. 15-17. What an agenda they have filled with all about wildlife and range management. You need to get online and see the agenda that is packed with information and fun.

The West Central States Wool Growers Convention in Sun Valley, Idaho on Nov. 16-20, is always a must for range sheep and small flock producers. This convention always attracts the best speakers, largest group of wool buyers and sheep packers, public land managers and sheep producers from the region. The fun and information there is one of the best.

On Nov. 22, the Southeast Wyoming Beef Production Convention will be held in Torrington at the Rendezvous Center. If you raise cattle or are in the beef business, this day is filled with information you need to survive the falling prices of cattle.

And last will be the Wyoming Stock Grower’s Association Winter Meeting in Casper at the Parkway Plaza on Dec. 5-7. More on that event later.