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Hard to Believe

Written by Dennis Sun

A new study out from the research firm YouGov and the Washington, D.C. based Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation surveyed over 2,000 people regarding their views on socialism and the communist political system. It was reported in the press, like Fox News, but I’m not sure of the accuracy of the survey. Regardless, it does give one something to think about. I also don’t know where in the U.S. the people were surveyed, but I’m sure it wasn’t Wyoming.

The biggest news taken from the study was that one out of every two millennials surveyed said they would rather live in a socialist or communist country than a capitalist democracy like the U.S. A Harvard University poll conducted last year also found 51 percent of the 18- to 29-year-olds in the U.S. said they opposed capitalism. Millennials now make up the largest generation in America, and we can see from the last presidential election with all of the support for Bernie Sanders, capitalism is not popular with some.

Some say millennials “are the next great generation,” which I find hard to believe.

Millennials are defined as those born in 1982 and approximately the 20 years thereafter – from 1982 to 2004.

Back to the results of the survey, I understand capitalism, but I really didn’t know the true meanings of socialism and communism or what their differences were. Socialism and communism both adhere to the principle that the resources of the economy should be collectively owned by the public and controlled by a central organization.

They differ, however, in the management and control of the economy. In socialism, a majority of people themselves decide through communes or popularly elected councils how the economy should work. Communism, on the other hand, controls its economy through a single authoritarian party and everyone belongs to the same class of people.

Socialism and communism also have different views on capitalism, but they both want rid of all the churches. Socialists also believe capitalism can exist in a socialist state and vice versa.

I don’t think millennials have much sense of history. The report found that one in five Americans in their 20s consider former Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin a hero, despite his genocide of the Ukrainians and Russian Orthodox priests. Over a quarter of the millennials polled also thought the same for Vladimir Lenin and Li Jong Un.

One of the most troubling findings of the report is that over 40 percent of Americans believe that there should be restrictions placed on the First Amendment and free speech to ensure that anything being said is not “offensive.” Those Americans must have come from New York City or California. Out West, we consider it entertainment to be offensive.

I think a lot of millennials were taught history or revisionist history by those who didn’t tell the true story and just chose to tell their story. Millennials are also in favor of more rights for the workforce, such as we are seeing now with the National Football League allowing players to disregard the National Anthem.

The findings show the percentage of millennials who prefer socialism over capitalism is a full 10 points higher than that of the general population, which is very troubling.

Democracy is the art of disciplining oneself so that one need not be disciplined by others – that is, it’s about being accountable for your actions.